10 Classic Shotguns Every Wingshooter Should Own

dukhuntnfool

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Good old dependable guns are a lot like good old dependable women not enough of them around and if you have one cherish it and never let it go
 

Arrieta

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Good old dependable guns are a lot like good old dependable women not enough of them around and if you have one cherish it and never let it go

Shoulda named my wife "Parker"...

iu
 

3B209

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Was surprised to see the a5 down at 8. Figured it'd be top 3 hands down. Maybe I'm bias as thats what I hunt with, a Belgium gun with a Japanese barrel. Once a year, on a sunny day, I run my gramps 28" FC model 12. Pretty suspect list imo.
 
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Calikev

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whether it be good a side by side or an over n' under. IMHO, nothing handles better, and nothing feels as natural, as a well made and balanced double barreled shotgun. I've shot chukar, pheasants, geese and plenty limits of ducks with a side by side and have never thought of it as a handicap. I find that most of the time the third shot is a wasted shot and when I duck hunt and use my Benelli M2, I often only load two shells into the gun. I love shooting my Rizzini O/Us at dog trials and pheasants, and take my side by sides into the refugees with me --though I will admit, while I know that an O/U is cumbersome in the duck blind, and I don't enjoy shooting most pumps and autoloaders as much as my double guns (even though my first shotgun was an 870 Wingmaster).

My Dad would agree with you on the O/U. Watched him shoot one for everything growing up and he absolutely crushed with it. Since moving onto single barreled guns he never was the same shooter he was with those guns. Obviously shooting is a diminishing skill so with age that had something to do with it but he always loved the stacks.

For me I can't stand the things. Never could hit with them and never had a use for them as I don't shoot targets all that much and don't do a lot of upland hunting where I feel like they have a better purpose.

In terms of waterfowl guns they have their place but in my opinion they are a disadvantage in many situations because of the third shot. I have had numerous people tell me they "seldom" need a third shot, yet I have witnessed them need a third shot in situations and not have one. They are reliable but for waterfowl hunting I certainly don't want to use one. That is obviously my opinion and lots of folks will disagree which is fine but that is just my preference. On the slowest days I want to maximize my opportunities and not feel handicapped. Either on triples, cripples or flub ups where I need the third shot.
 

gunnarmcc

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My Dad would agree with you on the O/U. Watched him shoot one for everything growing up and he absolutely crushed with it. Since moving onto single barreled guns he never was the same shooter he was with those guns. Obviously shooting is a diminishing skill so with age that had something to do with it but he always loved the stacks.

For me I can't stand the things. Never could hit with them and never had a use for them as I don't shoot targets all that much and don't do a lot of upland hunting where I feel like they have a better purpose.

In terms of waterfowl guns they have their place but in my opinion they are a disadvantage in many situations because of the third shot. I have had numerous people tell me they "seldom" need a third shot, yet I have witnessed them need a third shot in situations and not have one. They are reliable but for waterfowl hunting I certainly don't want to use one. That is obviously my opinion and lots of folks will disagree which is fine but that is just my preference. On the slowest days I want to maximize my opportunities and not feel handicapped. Either on triples, cripples or flub ups where I need the third shot.
I shoot much better with my O/U then I do with a single barrel gun I think it has something to do with my swing continuing through the bird. Having said that I have never taken an O/U into the marsh and doubt that I ever will.
 

freefall

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I grew up shooting my dads Wingmaster. Killed absolutely everything with it. When he passed I asked for 2things , that 870 & his 7mm. I cherish that gun …
 

Arrieta

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My Dad would agree with you on the O/U. Watched him shoot one for everything growing up and he absolutely crushed with it. Since moving onto single barreled guns he never was the same shooter he was with those guns. Obviously shooting is a diminishing skill so with age that had something to do with it but he always loved the stacks.

For me I can't stand the things. Never could hit with them and never had a use for them as I don't shoot targets all that much and don't do a lot of upland hunting where I feel like they have a better purpose.

In terms of waterfowl guns they have their place but in my opinion they are a disadvantage in many situations because of the third shot. I have had numerous people tell me they "seldom" need a third shot, yet I have witnessed them need a third shot in situations and not have one. They are reliable but for waterfowl hunting I certainly don't want to use one. That is obviously my opinion and lots of folks will disagree which is fine but that is just my preference. On the slowest days I want to maximize my opportunities and not feel handicapped. Either on triples, cripples or flub ups where I need the third shot.

I only know of two people that shot waterfowl with an O/U. Both were excellent shots. But I agree, in general, the O/U makes a terrible waterfowl gun, mainly due to the way the action opens. I shoot ducks and geese with a Benelli M2 only because it's plastic, easy to load in the blind, takes a beating, doubles as a paddle, and is generally impervious to mud, grass, water and dogs. It's a tool, nothing more. I hate the damn Benelli "click" that goes with it and despite constantly checking to see the bolt is fully closed, I find myself missing more birds feet down because that stupid lever got caught up on something somewhere along the way.

As to the Wingmaster... there's a classic for sure. I have two 870s --a Wingmaster with a 30" barrel and a full choke that was my first shotgun. I saved all year for it and bought it at Reed's Sporting Goods off Alum Rock Ave in 1976. When I brought it home, it might have been taller than I was, but I was determined to grow into it. I shot my first duck with it --a hen mallard in Dos Palos in 1978 when next-door neighbor "good ole' Pete" took me duck hunting. The other 870 has a plastic stock and was my first dedicated duck gun bought on sale at Walmart in 1992 when I really got the fever.

I think there are a lot of boys, who are now becoming old men, who consider the 870 and a pair of SEARS "Toughskins" to be as good as any childhood friend.
 

Rick Hall

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Every time one of you fellows mention something with multiple barrels, I think of a friend who goose guides at the camp with us noting, "When I saw a double-barrel come out of the case, I knew we were screwed." (More than a little ironically, he later fell in with some guests who import triple barreled guns and now shoots one of those that must swing like a fence post.)

My own experience with double-barreled waterfowlers has, generally, been bad and, likely, emphasized by their relative rarity. On one end of that spectrum, there was a young blue-blood who's complaint that the 12ga shells he'd brought wouldn't fit in his O/U was met with a smile and a box of my 20s - only to find they were too large for his 28ga, as well. On the other, a wealthy New Orleans lawyer who made sure I noted a framed sports section page celebrating his past World .410 Skeet Shooting Championship before unlocking his "Parker Room" to show me literal wall-to-wall-to-wall-to-wall racks of Parkers some poor boys might dream of offering a gonad for. And when I asked which were his favorites, I was informed that they were in a band vault. Couldn't hit a goose that wasn't landing with whatever Parker(s) he later brought to our camp - albeit while laying out white-spreading for them.

In between, there's been this 10ga stage gun totter doing his level best to deafen his son and I:
1653041154352.jpeg


And virtually every O/U handler doing his best to level our cover:
1653041779019.jpeg


Of course, there have also been no end of pump and semi-auto shooters who couldn't hit the bottom of the blind with a dropped box of shells and even some with Benellis who needed shown how easy it is to avoid an operator "click".
 

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