16 gauge dilemma

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by Hawkeyebowhunter, May 28, 2019.

  1. Hawkeyebowhunter

    Hawkeyebowhunter Senior Refuge Member

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    Good afternoon,

    Looking at an A5-Sweet Sixteen.

    My problem is that I can't decide whether to get a new one, or find an older Jap/Belgium model.

    Both can be had for around the same price, if not less $ for the older models.

    This will primarily be an upland gun, but that doesn't mean I'm not going to take it a few times a year into the duck blind as well.

    In Iowa I can find anything from teal to Canada's on any given hunt that I'd bring this gun, and would like to make sure I've got enough firepower so I'd cook up some non-tox loads most likely.

    I wouldn't be able to duplex any steel into the older model guns, and the older ones are fixed choke-I have no idea how the bismuth or other heavier than steel loads would pattern in a fixed choke gun.

    The newer A5 S.S. just looks/feels cheap to me, and I've heard of some issues with the stock breaking (this is heresay and could be a non-issue, that's why they have a nice warranty).

    If you could only buy one-which would you go with, and why?
     
  2. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    Indian Territory, Oklahoma
    Have two of the original SS's and bought a Japanese barrel to shoot non-toxic loads with through them. Shoot #4 steel (Remington Nitro-Mags) over decoys although am going to do some more extensive pattern testing with that cartridge in #2's but with more open choke configurations. Handloads in #5's are also very effective over the decoys but the 1 1/8 ounce loads of #7 TSS are the ultimate ordnance for when you need to reach out to 70+ yards. I shoot them better than most all of the twelve gauges in battery and they are much quicker handling as well. I almost pulled the trigger on the "new" (inertia) one but the funky choke tubes and reports on them were a turnoff. The broken stock incident was apparently a one-off situation as I haven't heard anymore it.
     
    Hawkeyebowhunter likes this.
  3. Mrs.10GAGENUT

    Mrs.10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    I'd go with the Jap made Sweet 16 as JP suggested, I wanted one of the new inertia guns but backed off from the bad reports and price tag on a basically unreliable gun IMO. Browning could and should do better especially for the ridiculously high price they want for a new one.
     
    creedsduckman likes this.
  4. Nocalhonker

    Nocalhonker Elite Refuge Member

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    You could also send the barrel in and get it fitted for screw in Chokes.
     
  5. A5Mag12

    A5Mag12 Elite Refuge Member

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    You can find a new to near new Miroku made Sweet-16 with Invector barrel for what a new one cost and have a gun worth way more than one of the new ones. One looks like a 5 year gun and the other will last for generations.
     
    Hawkeyebowhunter, sbezoey and JP like this.
  6. Hawkeyebowhunter

    Hawkeyebowhunter Senior Refuge Member

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    What's the best placed to look for the Japanese A5 S.S.? I'm finding quite a fee sweet 16's, but little to no Japanese 16's
     
  7. NW BIRDHUNTER

    NW BIRDHUNTER Senior Refuge Member

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    Oregon
    I don't own one of the new A-5 sweet 16's but have read a lot of good reviews on them at 16ga.com. The problem with the older A-5's is the weight, no choke tubes, (except some limited Japan models) and they're not designed to shoot steel shot. Most the guys I know that had the older nice A-5's don't want to beat them up in the duck blind and some sold them off and bought the new A-5. I would buy the new A-5 especially if I was primarily using it for upland birds because of the lighter weight, screw in chokes, for any type of shot, (including waterfowl loads) and warranty, and parts availability. Some of the guys at 16ga.com have converted their new A-5's to English stocks and shortened the barrel which makes a light fast handling upland bird gun.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2019
    Hawkeyebowhunter likes this.
  8. Soggy Socks

    Soggy Socks Senior Refuge Member

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    I have both my first is the Belgian Sweet I bought as a kid long long time ago, I bought an A5 28"Sweet this past winter. Haven't played around with it much now that turkey season is winding down I will shoot it more. I will tell you that as an upland gun it would be nice to carry something that light. I'm not so sure Id want to shoot heavy loads through it much though for typical duck hunting, recoil is substantial. Both are nice guns i think for what you are describing I'd go withe original Sweet.
     
  9. Mrs.10GAGENUT

    Mrs.10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    You have to take what a lot of them on 16ga.com with a grain of salt, lot of good and a lot of bad information on that website from what I've read.
    Weight really isn't a factor with the Jap A5's vs the new ones, in my book if your going to pay out the wazoo get something that's reliable and not a roll of the dice.
     
  10. Mrs.10GAGENUT

    Mrs.10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    If your really serious about buying one Arts Gun shop in Hillsboro Missouri can probably fix you up with one, be warned their prices are not cheap by any means.
     

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