.22 Creedmore

Discussion in 'Big Game Hunting Forum' started by OneShotBandit, Feb 5, 2021.

  1. Mudbug

    Mudbug Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    128
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2020
    Montana the only caliber restriction is no 72 calibers, and bison I think it is 32 caliber or larger.
    Anything goes on anything else.
     
  2. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator

    Messages:
    24,061
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Location:
    Sula, MT
    Pretty sure NV is .22 and above. Back in the day, I think it also included a FPS requirement. All Dad ever used on deer was a Win Mod 70 in .223
     
    Fogie likes this.
  3. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    5,616
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2014
    Location:
    Close to where I hunt
    My .224 Clark with hand-swaged 85 gr spire-points knock the crap out of them to ! Montana Whitetail have no clue what hit them as I shoot them
    with my 22/250 with 60 gr Nosler's flat-base , only the white patch counts !
     
  4. Vahunter

    Vahunter Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,560
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Location:
    Virginia
    Never shot an elk. Shot around 60-65 whitetails though. I use a 30-06 now, which is better than a .270, which is better than a .243, which is better than a .223..... You get the picture. I'm sure the same applies to elk
     
    OneShotBandit likes this.
  5. Drake91

    Drake91 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    989
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2017
    Location:
    PA
    I never hunted elk got buddies who have... but from the stories I heard and even a few outfitters they went with seems like a .270 is the smallest they all want to go... my buddies wanted to book with and outfitter and one of them had a .270 other 2 had 300 win mags... and the outfitter told em I wont let the guy come with the .270 I recommend a 30 cal or bigger to hunt here
     
  6. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    23,101
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Location:
    HSV, Alabama
    I'm not seeing the appeal of trying to use tiny-caliber guns to kill large game. Why throw a grain of sand at them, when you could throw a large rock? Both will kill with a well-placed shot of an animal standing perfectly still. Only one will allow you some slop-factor and a better chance of not just crippling up some completely unsuspecting animal a quarter-mile away because it moved it's head right as you pulled the trigger. Then again, I also don't see the appeal in shooting at an animal that's bedded down a quarter-mile away either, so maybe my opinion isn't great.

    If I'm making 1/4 mile shots on large game, give me a .300 WIN MAG (maybe even a .338 Lapua, if I'm just getting to pick out a random gun to take). I could make do with a .30-06 or .270. I wouldn't even take my .25-06, and I know for a fact I'm good to 800 with it on a 10" metal gong consistently. Too many things to go wrong. One blade of grass turns a .22 round moving that fast to dust.
     
    OneShotBandit and Drake91 like this.
  7. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,229
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2017
    Location:
    Shenandoah valley
    It's really all about bullet construction. Caliber plays a role too, but I'll take a well bonded, heavy for caliber 6.5 over a ballistic tip in 300 win mag for elk.

    Need to be conscious of what speed a bullet needs at impact too. Under and poor expansion, over and it can blow to pieces. Whitetail you can get away with a bullet that blows to pieces, heavier animals not so much.

    Some of these heavy for caliber bullets are getting pretty impressive. I don't keep up with anything .22 cal, but we using 165 gr bullets in 6.5 mm now, that use to be 308 weight. 190's in 7mm?
    I don't discount a bullet that much for it's diameter. It's how it performs that counts.

    Plus many people just won't be as accurate with a larger gun.
     
  8. Fogie

    Fogie Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    193
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2021
    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    It was any centerfire with a length longer than a .44 mag for a while, then any centerfire larger than .22 caliber, then a minimum of 1000 foot pounds at 100 yards (trying to squeeze most .223 out), now back to any centerfire bigger than .22 cal again.
    A tag for each, doe and buck...those were the days, Ruby deer-))) Shot a lot of those with .223, yep. Always hand-loaded premium bullets, though. 55gr Sierra Game Kings. Did until The Buck of My Lifetime gave me nothing but butt shot and then was gone into Thompson Creek bottom, would have put .308 through him lengthwise if I had one.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
  9. Fogie

    Fogie Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    193
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2021
    Location:
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Elk soak up a bullet like most wouldn't believe, often the only indication of a hit in the boiler room is the sound.
    After shooting some with .308, which worked, bought a .338 Win Mag which still doesn't stop them from standing there or running a while. All my buddies borrow it for their tags, though. A 200gr premium at 3100 fps is like a big bore laser...pow
     
    Drake91 likes this.
  10. Missy Skeeter

    Missy Skeeter Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    745
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2014
    Location:
    Alaska
    Moose also will stand there while you hear the "thwack" of shot after shot into the boiler room.
    A couple minutes can go by and the bull tips over dead.
     
    Fogie likes this.

Share This Page