?Are coyotes a threat to medium to large size dogs?

Northhunter

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I agree. Walking through the woods and having a pack of wolves show up will make anyone’s adrenaline start to rush.
There was a story from a trapper somewhere up here, I think. Dude was crossing a lake in winter and noticed a wolf or wolves behind him near shore. Crossed the lake and got back to his cabin without incident. For fun he let out a howl from the porch and the woods around his cabin erupted. The pack had followed and was loitering just out of sight.

For years the narrative was always "there's never been a confirmed case of a healthy wolf killing a human", which was dog$#!. I've seen them on more than several occasions, but always solo animals. Never a pack. I've never felt uneasy in the bush, but if one ever decides to take interest I wouldn't like my chances without a gun.
 

Tejas

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There was a story from a trapper somewhere up here, I think. Dude was crossing a lake in winter and noticed a wolf or wolves behind him near shore. Crossed the lake and got back to his cabin without incident. For fun he let out a howl from the porch and the woods around his cabin erupted. The pack had followed and was loitering just out of sight.

For years the narrative was always "there's never been a confirmed case of a healthy wolf killing a human", which was dog$#!. I've seen them on more than several occasions, but always solo animals. Never a pack. I've never felt uneasy in the bush, but if one ever decides to take interest I wouldn't like my chances without a gun.
It is hard to confirm a mortality when consumption is 100%. A pack of wolves is not going to leave much behind with human sized prey.
 

Mudtoes

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I had a Chesapeake named Cork and that dog would run them out of ditches when I was hunting pheasants with him. On 3 occasions I had him busting brush and had a coyote pop out with him in pursuit. Two coyotes died, one got a load of 5’s in his rear as he was out there a bit. Dog would also go out and circle the dead coyote and then go back to hunting.
 

There.is.no.ST

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We are infested with coyotes here. Three large packs as best I can tell.....and they are dying regularly, but not in sufficient numbers. No way I would let my 5 month old pups outside, out of my control. I carry a pistol at night when I get them out.

Coyotes will take on compensatory reproduction, increasing breeding and litter size in response to an increase in mortality among a localized population. I don't believe they have a pack hierarchy like wolves, but dominant pairs will suppress breeding among subordinates. If a number of the dominant animals get killed, it disrupts that suppression.
Their breeding traits and intelligence makes them almost impossible to eradicate.

I've never really heard that they "know what a good population size" is. Less food and nutrition would = less reproduction, but that's a common and natural response among all mammals. A black bear will breed and den with fertilized eggs, but if the fat reserves aren't there, the sow will abort embryonic development.

I believe they just keep growing in numbers as long as a food source allows. Stuff like mange is natures response to that, I guess.

We have them within the city here. Miles upon miles of wilderness and food. They're still in the city.
I was going to post this very comment - coyotes are known to increase reproduction in areas where hunting lowers their population. Very nice survival adaption, but problematic for other species.

We haven't had as many yotes around the farm over the past year as we did during the first two we lived here. I don't know why, either. My son called in and smacked a young female last year with his AR, and maybe one succumbed to his trapline, but no major killing events. We have a Great Pyrenees that guards some of our livestock and I know he hasn't had any close encounters, as we haven't seen any blood on him or dead yotes in the pen.

Matter of fact, we have a carcass cam ongoing right now and only one coyote ever showed over a week's time. It was skittish as all heck and didn't show up more than the one time, maybe 15 minutes before it disappeared. Vultures and hawks aplenty, but no yotes. Rarely hear them singing around the area, either. I'm not complaining, but it is a bit odd that they've scattered.
 

Tejas

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I was going to post this very comment - coyotes are known to increase reproduction in areas where hunting lowers their population. Very nice survival adaption, but problematic for other species.

We haven't had as many yotes around the farm over the past year as we did during the first two we lived here. I don't know why, either. My son called in and smacked a young female last year with his AR, and maybe one succumbed to his trapline, but no major killing events. We have a Great Pyrenees that guards some of our livestock and I know he hasn't had any close encounters, as we haven't seen any blood on him or dead yotes in the pen.

Matter of fact, we have a carcass cam ongoing right now and only one coyote ever showed over a week's time. It was skittish as all heck and didn't show up more than the one time, maybe 15 minutes before it disappeared. Vultures and hawks aplenty, but no yotes. Rarely hear them singing around the area, either. I'm not complaining, but it is a bit odd that they've scattered.
That reproduction theory is BS. Always has been. That latest dribble is they alter ovulation and such in response to territorial howling. The less howling the more pups, LOL. All BS to basically say, shooting coyotes will make a high coyote population higher. That is simply not true. They respond like any other animal to food supply and the availability of suitable habitat. Biggest factor besides food would be disease and pressure. Parvo and distemper can easily curtail pup production along with other diseases. The other factor is pressure. Most of the problems I have had over the years have been in or around denning sites. These sites can cause acute problems year after year until dealt with. The guard dog is most likely putting pressure on those coyotes, as well as you shooting some. That very well could have altered the local den locations. Most of the guard dogs I know set up territories of varying size, any coyote they can catch in that perimeter are killed, and pups are not hard for a guard dog to catch.
 

JRS

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A pair killed 4 of my sheep one year. I killed both of them. I rarely have issues now.

I’d say the most important part of the equation is how hard you kill them, 9/10 not 1/10.
 

Captain black

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There is a good book called Coyote America by Dan Flores. It covered a lot of interesting stuff like territory expansion and eradication of wolves and coyotes. Highly recommend
 

Northhunter

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It is hard to confirm a mortality when consumption is 100%. A pack of wolves is not going to leave much behind with human sized prey.
They don't leave much behind with anything. The mortality part wasn't in question.. a recent kill site can be pretty obvious. There were "suspected" cases, with evidence of wolves present. But without anyone to see it actually go down...
A woman was killed here in an enclosure, along with a man out west outside a mining camp. With those cases going public away went the narrative, because those repeating it could no longer say it and claim that it was true.
That reproduction theory is BS. Always has been. That latest dribble is they alter ovulation and such in response to territorial howling. The less howling the more pups, LOL. All BS to basically say, shooting coyotes will make a high coyote population higher. That is simply not true. They respond like any other animal to food supply and the availability of suitable habitat. Biggest factor besides food would be disease and pressure. Parvo and distemper can easily curtail pup production along with other diseases. The other factor is pressure. Most of the problems I have had over the years have been in or around denning sites. These sites can cause acute problems year after year until dealt with. The guard dog is most likely putting pressure on those coyotes, as well as you shooting some. That very well could have altered the local den locations. Most of the guard dogs I know set up territories of varying size, any coyote they can catch in that perimeter are killed, and pups are not hard for a guard dog to catch.
There are lots of people more in tune with the subject than you or I that would disagree.. Both that it's "BS" and just a "theory". Some of them studied coyotes as a problem. There's never been a successful eradication program, and there's a reason for that.

I've never heard anyone respectable claim that shooting them makes the numbers higher. Just that they have a reproductive response to mortality.

Canine parvovirus is derived from feline parvo, and it's believed that happened about 40-50 years ago. It's much more of a problem for a domestic dog than it is a wolf or coyote. We vaccinate and treat pets because we don't want to lose the pet. A wild population takes the hit, and comes out of it with natural immunity.
 

Tejas

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They don't leave much behind with anything. The mortality part wasn't in question.. a recent kill site can be pretty obvious. There were "suspected" cases, with evidence of wolves present. But without anyone to see it actually go down...
A woman was killed here in an enclosure, along with a man out west outside a mining camp. With those cases going public away went the narrative, because those repeating it could no longer say it and claim that it was true.

There are lots of people more in tune with the subject than you or I that would disagree.. Both that it's "BS" and just a "theory". Some of them studied coyotes as a problem. There's never been a successful eradication program, and there's a reason for that.

I've never heard anyone respectable claim that shooting them makes the numbers higher. Just that they have a reproductive response to mortality.

Canine parvovirus is derived from feline parvo, and it's believed that happened about 40-50 years ago. It's much more of a problem for a domestic dog than it is a wolf or coyote. We vaccinate and treat pets because we don't want to lose the pet. A wild population takes the hit, and comes out of it with natural immunity.
FYI I am pretty in tune with the subject, but I will leave it at that.
 

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