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Big water/bad weather boating advice thread

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by billblack, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. MissedAgain

    MissedAgain Elite Refuge Member

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    I want to jump on EZE for B&M-ing about someone going 3 miles in 3 ft rollers in a 14 ft boat. If it was a V hull with some sides, I would have no problem doing that - rollers are not exactly wind born chop... BTW - I used to fish the ocean in a 14 ft V very often - never had a problem.

    Some guys are more able in a small boat than others are in a larger craft. It all depends on upbringing and experience. Guys raised with boats are a lot more able than guys who decide to go & buy one at 40 years old.

    all that being said - Let's keep our "better than thou" thoughts to ourselves and have a nice post.
     
  2. MissedAgain

    MissedAgain Elite Refuge Member

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    Good call on the waders - never had neoprene ones...
     
  3. Blacklab227

    Blacklab227 Elite Refuge Member

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    Very true, and I agree totally. Nothing beats experience.

    I also agree that it's best to get out of your waders if you are going to get to shore. I hear people say that waders will float and insulate because they are made out of neoprene. Wetsuits are made out of neoprene as well, and waders are like a wetsuit, so they're bound to work the same, right? Wrong. A wetsuit works by trapping a thin layer of water between the body and the insulating neoprene. Your body warms the water and this is what keeps you from freezing. It's important to note, however, that there is probably less than 1/2 gallon of water trapped in a wetsuit. Further, a tight wetsuit keeps the water IN the wetsuit, rather than allow it to escape. This is why divers will often fill their wetsuit while they are still aboard a boat, and before they dive. Waders, on the other hand, are going to trap five or more GALLONS of water in them. Your body simply cannot warm that much water, especially if the water is freezing or near freezing. Further, as one tries to swim, new, frigid water will enter them. Simply put, you will be pulling extra weight and face tremendous water resistance. It's like swimming through oatmeal. Get out of your waders. Keep your PFD on, and swim WITH THE CURRENT to shore if possible. Let the wind and water do the work.

    Here is my suggestion- If you are going to wear a PFD while underway and take it off once you are anchored, buy a brightly colored PFD. Keep it in a camo storage bag if necessary. It's very difficult to find something in the water when there is a lot of wave activity. A red or chartreuse PFD is much easier to see.

    Use the waypoint feature on your GPS to mark several points on a lake or river. Obviously, it's important to mark the boat ramp or the hunting spot. It's also a good idea to mark a familiar wing dam, bridge, point, or comfortable landmark. At the very least, it will give you peace of mind and a clear head. It will also help keep you from outguessing your navigation equipment.
     
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  4. CJS

    CJS Senior Refuge Member

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    Wear the life jacket and get a boat with a tall transom and get a longshaft motor to go with it. I sunk a boat in March and barely made it out after a couple waves came over the transom.
     
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  5. eze

    eze Senior Refuge Member

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    Did I ever JUMP on him for doing that? UMMMM no, all I gave was my opinion. You guys wanna talk about being safe, going out 3 miles in a 14' boat is just not something that i wanna do. Been boating for about 20 of my 24 years in ALL kinds of boats so its not like I dont know what Im doing. You would never see a 14' boat out on rough water here.
     
  6. Blacklab227

    Blacklab227 Elite Refuge Member

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    It's okay. We ran a 17' Mako to the Bahamas a number of times. We weren't alone.

    Not landlocked regards...
     
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  7. ntropy

    ntropy Elite Refuge Member

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    I can tell you from personal experience that this statement is not true. I participated in a rescue in frigid Alaska waters in which the neoprene waders allowed the hunter to float like a cork and swim. The waders did not fill with excessive amounts of water or impede the hunter UNTIL attempting to stand up at the shoreline. While in the water the water pressure kept the waders tight against the hunting clothes. Up standing up the water in the clothes drained into the boots and the boots trapped the water and made it difficult to walk.

    I have jumped into a pool where waders and I had no problem staying afloat except the boots trap air and force you to float in sitting position. When PFD or float coat is added you float like a cork.

    I agree I wear a bright chartreuse float coat. I once was talking to a Coast Guard crew on a cell phone while they were looking for me standing on shore in a camo PFD with a personal strobe light flashing in broad daylight, despite me telling them that they were looking directly at me they failed to see me.
     
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  8. wtrfwlr43

    wtrfwlr43 Elite Refuge Member

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    Know your boat and your boat handling capabilities. Sometimes even if you think you are an expert is the big wind worth the risk to kill a duck? Use common sense. That said there are times when the weather forecast goes bad, REAL BAD. Happened to me and a buddy years ago hunting big water in SE Virginia. Winds were supposed to be NE 5-10 with snow flurries and we ran across the 6 mile width of a 16 mile long bay. Needless to say when the wind there was over 15 out of any North we didn't run across, 16 ft 54" botton width semi-V jonboat. Well at sunset the wind went to NE at 30 gusting to 40 and snowing sideways. We quartered waves for what seemed like hours. The spray freezing on us and the boat. Visibilty was squat with the snow. We were lucky not to hit a deep water blind or run aground and/or swamp on a shoal. We made it in and had 4 inches of snow on the ground in SE Virginia :eek:. After that I always gave my wife a float plan with options A,B and C of where I was hunting (options just in case we changed our minds when we got there). Bought a cell phone (pretty new stuff at the time). Made up a survival bag (bag floated and was completely water proof) with: Vaccumed packed extra socks, gloves, warm head gear. Magnesium bar (firestarter), spare folding pocketknife, waterproof matches, Survival strobe light, two space blankets (orange one side/ silver other). two survival sleepings bags (aluminum foil rolled up bout the size of a pack of cigarettes), got a good GPS. vacuum pack beef jerky. The bag all packed was not that big. Took it whenever we hunted big water.
     
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  9. MissedAgain

    MissedAgain Elite Refuge Member

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    EZ - my apologies. :eek: Seemed like an attack to me. Probably because I'm partial to 14 ft V hulls and 25 hp motors.
     
  10. ALMODUX

    ALMODUX Elite Refuge Member

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    I hope nobody dies because they were dumb enough to follow questionable advice, suggesting they throw away bouyancy and an immersion insulator.:nutz:z:doh
     
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