Big water/bad weather boating advice thread

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by billblack, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. Bob Johnson

    Bob Johnson Elite Refuge Member

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    NY
    NOT a lot to add,

    anchors are important...you can be 50 yards from shore and the motor dies, its an offshore wind...the further you drift the grater the danger...so getting the anchor out quickly is important...dont burry the anchor in the boat!!


    In my boat one of the first rules is dont stack crap on the anchor!! the line lays down then the anchor sits ontop of the line!!!

    if i need to grab the anchor and throw it...i can!!

    waves are the biggest danger, which results in water in the boat...a shield above the transom to keep water from coming over the stern can really help .

    kicker motors!!! they can at least motor you to the closest shore and you can stay alive!!!

    i have bailed out of the trip home once...three miles of brutal quartering waves...even along shore made me decide to ditch my rig in the first cove i could find.....call a cab, come back three days later and get my boat!!! water was flat

    cost me 3 hours and $50 instead of mine and my buddies life.

    for guys out in the BIG swamps, or way offshore..a cheap SPOT is a really nice thing to have

    bbad bad bob
     
  2. Blacklab227

    Blacklab227 Elite Refuge Member

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    Pull the Rope
    Gentlemen,
    I never said anything about boyancy. I did say something about the questionable insulating qualities of waders and I said something about impeded mobility. I ALSO said that you MUST wear your PFD. Would I stay in neoprene waders if I knew I was going to float for a while? Maybe. Probably. Would I get out of them and keep my PFD on if I needed to get to shore and I knew I could make it? You bet.
     
  3. FOWLER267

    FOWLER267 Guest

    I hope so too!


    Ive' scuba dived in a rock quarry with the water starting out close to 90 at the surface. I had a 5 mil wetsuit and a hood on but tried going without gloves.

    We hit the first thermocline at 45 feet and the second at 60. Temps dropped to 45 degrees and my hands felt like they were being stabbed with knives!!! Can you imagine that feeling over your whole body?

    Ive' also been in a boat that swamped in a November storm after Thanksgiving. I had neroprene waders ON and had the life jackets in a bag and I still swam to shore as did the other guy with neroprenes on.

    Hypothermia will KILL you while you screw around trying to take your waders off. Wear a PFD and wear your coat OVER your waders and you will have a BETTER chance of surviving.

    You can die anytime you go into cold water but you increase your survival chances by using your gear and keeping in ON!
     
  4. Blacklab227

    Blacklab227 Elite Refuge Member

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    It looks like we're on the same page then.
     
  5. 870m

    870m Refuge Member

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    Nov 14, 2006
    Location:
    RI.
    Don't forget your dogs needs during freezing weather. Fresh water, flotation, a means to dry them thourghly. A wet dog brings a lot of water in a boat that will quickly freeze and become a slipping hazard, fall and bang your head the dog can't pull you back in, ask me how I know. Also dog collars are dangerous, seen them get hung up on bouys more than once. Becareful of dogs in floating ice or surf there is a real hazard of crushing. Always have control of the dog in a boat, small ones in particular, big dogs can shift balance quickly. And for gods sake make sure the firearms are made safe from roving dogs. One more point if your hunting out of the boat I got a real problem with heavy gloves and small trigger gauards during freezing weather,firearm safty first!!!!!!!!!!
     
  6. mrdancer

    mrdancer Senior Refuge Member

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    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    south dakota
    In addition to all of the above, I will emphasize a few more...

    1. Know your boat! X2>infinity
    2. File a float plan with someone you trust! X2>infinity
    3. If you can afford it, get a float coat - they are NICE! Always wear your PFD while afloat in cold water, or under way in any water. We lost a guy in the lake a year or two ago, they found his boat with the motor still running (didn't have his kill switch on!) and his life jacket sitting next to the boat seat - his body finally floated up the next spring when the water warmed up.
    4. In addition to an anchor, add a drift sock. In some situations, you may be in open water and drifting TOWARD a shoreline with a dead motor - the drift sock tied to the bow will keep the bow pointed into the waves and let the boat drift toward shore while handling waves much better than a dead drift. The drift sock also takes up very little storage space.
    5. Carry an old cell phone with 12v charger. Most of us have old cell phones lying around after upgrading plans/contracts/companies, etc. The old cell phone will not have service, but by law the cell phone companies must allow them to dial 911, IIRC.

    If you don't want to heed any of this advice, at least do this: Tie an orange milk jug to yourself with 100yds of line, so that we can find your body quickly and give your family closure.
     
    Ghetto Slaya likes this.
  7. NealH

    NealH Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Portland
    My last two weekends have been interesting. 2 weeks ago we planned a trip on the Columbia River to place we hunt few times a year and it can get nasty. The forcast was for 10mph winds. WHen we arrived it was closer to 30. We waited for light and decided to give it a try. When we went around the corner of the protected bay where we launched we were hit with 4-5ft rollers. We tucked tail and went home. Frustrating but very scary. I ran a skiff in alaska for 2 summers and that experience probably save us once we were in the thick of it. I have a homebuilt boat similar to a devlin snowgoose and it will handle 3 foot swells no problem but this was a whole nother ball game. Then last weekend I was in Puget Sound and my gas line had cracked by the outboard. We went to chase a cripple and it just died and would not run. Luckily it was a calm day and I have a tool box in the boat and within minutes I had repaired the line and we were up and running. The key there is know your equipment. I could tell something was wrong when we were motoring out but since we were following somebody I did not want to stop and hold them up. Next time I'll stop and fix it for sure. before I am few miles from the boat ramp.

    One more tip- put your cell phone in a ziplock baggy. It will keep it dry and the touch screen will still work through it. That way if it drops in the water or you go for a swim it still works:tu
     
  8. Major Woods

    Major Woods Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Griswold Ct.
    Yes I can.
    Water was 32 degrees when I flipped a canoe late December in a swamp during a snow storm. I dragged the canoe to shore (30 yards away) bailed it out and flipped it upright. Noticed that my gun was missing and went back in, dove around and found it on the first try, luckily as I was about done at that point.
    Cloths were frozen solid by the time I paddled my frozen butt back to the truck. Left the gear and canoe at the road side and sped home to soak in a hot shower until I thawed a bit. Went back and picked up the gear a couple hours later.
     
  9. HIGHBALLS

    HIGHBALLS Elite Refuge Member

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  10. merganser bill

    merganser bill Elite Refuge Member

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    n.granville n.y u.s

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