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Black bellies the southern equivalent to the greenhead

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by Dukesdad, May 23, 2020.

  1. duckbuster5901

    duckbuster5901 Elite Refuge Member

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    We,ve got a bag limit on Fulvous Tree Ducks in our Md. hunting regs. I,ve been duck hunting since about 20 and am 65 now and have yet to see one or here of one killed on the Eastern Shore of Md. With some of our wardens not being able to distinguish between a hen mallard and a Blk. Dk. would be kinda nice to see what their call was on one of those in the bag when checked!
     
  2. portahunter

    portahunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Here where I line in southeast Texas I'd say they are more like the resident non-migratory flocks of Canada geese others have further north. They roost in the the marsh at night but come in to town and spend the day at the local golf course by the hundreds or they split up and go to different areas around the local towns to feed.

    Once the shooting starts they wise up quick and usually head into town about 30 minutes before lst in the morning. Days when there is cloud cover and fog is the only time I've ever had any fly by me when I could shoot them. They don't seem to be real early nesters either. The ones in town are just now starting to break up into pars and starting to look for places to nest. Had I pair scouting out the pine trees at work for a cavity this past week. They'll nest in both tree cavities and on the ground.
     
  3. The Mad Duck

    The Mad Duck Elite Refuge Member

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    My Dad and I killed ALL of the Fulvous Tree ducks in coastal NC in the early 80's. We havent seen any since them. It would be nice if they expanded more up this way.
    FIFY


    Actually, you may be right. 6 were spotted that weekend and by the end of the weekend, there were ZERO alive :dv:dv
     
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  4. Steve Borgwald

    Steve Borgwald Elite Refuge Member

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    From east-central Ohio last May. A group of 6-7 were seen at various spots in the same time frame. Don't know how long they stayed. Black-bellied Whistling Ducks_Wright Marsh_Wayne Co.jpg
     
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  5. Dukesdad

    Dukesdad Senior Refuge Member

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    I graduated from northwest class of 76, still got kin there might have to pay em a visit. Black bellies in Tennessee! That’s cool
     
  6. Quarne

    Quarne Elite Refuge Member

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    Those tree ducks are really cool! Not something wisconsinites ever see up here.
     
  7. AvianQuest

    AvianQuest Elite Refuge Member

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    You might notice that whistling ducks are very goose like in many ways including the sexes being identical. They bridge the gap between ducks and geese and they could have been classified either way.
     
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  8. sleeping_dogs

    sleeping_dogs Elite Refuge Member

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    Never shot one, never eaten one, never seen one, but hope someday they show up in my neck of the woods.
     
  9. AvianQuest

    AvianQuest Elite Refuge Member

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    With the Fulvous whistling duck you are apt to have ONE show up most anywhere. They are the most widely distributed duck in the world, just not in numbers. The Fulvous whistling ducks in Africa and other countries are identical to the ones here in the U.S. Hurricanes have their start in Africa and this one species of duck will soar with the winds and many get caught up in the movement to the west. They also get caught up in dust storms that form in Africa and they ride the winds to the U.S. falling out where ever they chose. You will find sightings in many states, Canada, and even in the Sargasso Sea.

    We used to have hoards of the Fulvous's on the Texas Gulf Coast, but in the 1970's farmers planted corn seed that was coated with a toxic fungicide. The ducks would pull the shoots up and they were very susceptible to fungicide left on the seed. This caused a massive population crash that they still haven't come back from. The Black-bellied population was mostly in Mexico at the time and the fungicide was discontinued when they started expanding their range.
     
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  10. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    There is no bridging any gaps. They have less in common with ducks (genetically) than do swans and even less than geese do. They would have come from the same birds that swans came from. Any traits they have that seem duck like are due to convergent evolution not similar genetic backgrounds.


    And as to the fulvous there are some early writings suggesting that they were the most numerous species of duck in the early americas, possibly because they benefitted first and most from human farming techniques but they were wiped out by farmers.

    If you do some serious digging at one time fulvous were the most (recorded) harvested duck in parts of if not all of California.
     

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