Chesapeake Bay Retrievers

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by MJ, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Though I can think of an infamous Chesador "kennel" that claimed great working dogs and pets, they couldn't claim meaningful health clearances or verifiable evidence of aptitude on their breeding stock, and that's likely to be a rub with any such cross. Kinda like the old joke about Albert Einstein and Marilyn Monroe's child getting his looks and her brains, you'd be taking way too many unnecessary chances.
     
  2. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum Moderator

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    I've seen at least three liters of Labessei's and know two guys that bought dogs. I spent some time around one of the dogs it was a great dog. The second guy had nothing but good things to say about his dog but I never saw it work so I can't say one way or the other. The guy said the dog was a good swimmer, so that said it all to me.:yes
    Personally, I wouldn't take chance the on the Chessie half.:l:l:l
     
  3. Minn ducker

    Minn ducker New Member

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    I trained retrievers professionally for several years. Mostly Labs but also a few Golden Retrievers and Chesapeakes. I finally got one as my personal gun dog, she hunted for 12 seasons and did a super job. My training program included force fetch training and use of an electric collar. From working with the Chesapeakes, I learned to be a better trainer, because unlike a Labrador, you can't force a Chesapeake to do anything, you have to teach and repeat. If you can simplify the task to start with, and show the dog what you want him to do, he'll perform that task for you almost without fail. I learned that force fetch training with minimal ear pinching and much more simplification and repetition is better in the long run for all breeds. I found the Chesapeakes retained their training better than Labs or Goldens, in that once they knew what to do, that knowledge and their strong desire to please, outweighed other temptations that were a distraction to Labs and Goldens and caused them to make mistakes or disobey commands. This was particularly evident with water training involving cheating and water blind work. The Chesapeakes were strong in that department. Another benefit is the fact that I never saw my Chesapeake shivering in the duck blind. My personal gun dogs have included 7 black labs and 1 Chesapeake, and all the Labs would be visibly cold at some point late in the duck season; (I live and hunt ducks in Minnesota, and the season lasts until the lakes freeze over). The one downside for a Chesapeake is that they smell bad. I want my dog in the house with me these days, and despite frequent baths, they don't make a very good house dog because of this.
     
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  4. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    My current one recently reminded me that when a Bay dog starts to smell like one of those oil cloth coats the rich kids pay silly money to look cool (and be hot) in, it's past time to get the dead hair out of their coats. Being house dogs, mine have shed a good bit year-around, in addition to the major spring and fall periods of blowing winter and summer coats.
     
  5. duckbuster5901

    duckbuster5901 Senior Refuge Member

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    My ol girl missy was as close to my chessie jake as I,ve had in a lab. But she would visably show signs of being cold once repetative deep water retrieves were being made when iced up. Missy was a large female { kept her at 85 but she had reached a 100 early on), block headed and most people assumed her to be a male at first glance. Ol jake would just sit with his gonads in the water at the temps she got cold at. The colder the better for him.
     
  6. Underradar

    Underradar Elite Refuge Member

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    When I guided at Schenley Camp I swear Steve Tolson's Chessie "Cajun" grabbed a hunting knife in his mouth and stabbed Sherman Shaw's hip boots, with Sherman in them.
     
  7. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Heard a legitimate Chesapeake knock last night when a friend told me he'd run into someone who'd hunted at our camp and told him we had the ugliest dogs he'd ever seen. Fellow hadn't met me but confirmed my friend's suspicion that one of them was in a little white truck. Might shoulda been offended, but poor Marsh is the ugliest dog I've ever owned.

    Tickles me to recall a particularly polite guest calling him, "a peculiar looking little dog":
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  8. teul2

    teul2 Senior Refuge Member

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    Y'all argue like women. Sheesh!

    I'll say this, which has already been stated. if you need a 2x4 to train a chessie, you suck. A harsh word works better than a collar nick in most cases. Simplifying is the key to training a chessie. If they are failing, stop, take out options for failure, and run again. Rinse and repeat as needed. And always end on a good note.

    Their dedication to family is undeniable. And with that my first one (the light deadgrass one pictured below) did bite one person "protecting her people". And even he will admit to this day it was his fault. She, Canton, was the one man dog. I did a lot of socialization as a pup, but we lived alone. So she loved me more than anyone else. She was only ever aggressive in her kennel. It was her place and you did not belong there. That's where Donia stuck his finger one night (3/4 of the way into a bottle of scotch) and got bit. Open that kennel, and she'd be your best friend. After I got married, it took Canton and my wife a few years to come to an understanding. But she was always mine and no one else's.


    To the polar opposite, is my current dog Axle. He is a well bread dog (grandson to Dual CH AFC Westwind's Rudy of Nordais mentioned earlier). He was socialized way more, traveling running hunt tests, staying in hotels, etc. He's jmped in judges laps to say hey. And Axle lives in the house with my wife and 8y/o son. So he is not the one man dog that Canton was. My son can handle him in a finished level hunt test if he needed. All he wants is for you to touch him and fetch stuff. In that order. And you can be anyone. At 3y/o he has only just started to bark (like a lil B!+c# I might add) at people walking down the street. But then runs to them wanting love. His worst aggressive trait is he wants to sniff every woman's crotch he can. God he is a poon hound.

    Both of these dogs have shown amazing heart, desire, and talent in the field. And Axle in the hunt tests. A desire that I have never seen equaled in a lab. Canton on multiple occasions spent a solid hour or more cleaning up a 20 minute 6 man limit. Not once exiting the icy water. Axle is primed to make a spectacular duck dog too.

    I am hooked on the breed and doubt I'll ever not have one.
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    2019-08-15 13_54_37-Joel Williams (@teul2) • Instagram photos and videos.png WMSHRC ribbons.jpg
     
  9. Tim P

    Tim P Senior Refuge Member

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    It's been a long time since on the Forum. I've enjoyed this thread and have owned 3 Chessies. My first male was aggressive, but, I had no idea what I was getting into when we got him and lost him in a breakup with girl friend it was her dog after all. My second, a female, TAUGHT me how to duck hunt and was the best hunting partner ever. Made the mistake of congratulating her once for bringing me a live coot and she thought that was the most fun ever. I had a bit of trouble after that breaking her of it, but once she knew not to she stopped (mostly).
    My current female is a real sweetheart and just wants to be with me. Since, I hunt less than before she's been a bit slower picking it up but will not stop once she gets on scent. Once she understands what I want she just does it. Has picked up hand signs pretty well. If I need another dog for hunting it will be another female Chessie.
     
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  10. Phytoplankton

    Phytoplankton Elite Refuge Member

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    That's a beautiful dog as far as I'm concerned, my second chessie had a very similar "mask".
     

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