Concealed Carry Weapon

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by ARHHH4, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. tornadochaser

    tornadochaser Elite Refuge Member

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    Single stack 9mm's are the popular guns right now. Glock 43/43x/48, Walther PPS, and S & W Shield. The Sig P365 is the new hotness, same width as Glock 43 but almost double the capacity.
    Carrying is more about holster and clothing than it is the gun. With the right clothing I can conceal my fullsize M&P no prob. I've been setting up and carrying a Glock 43 for last few weeks and I really really like how well it hides. I can carry it appendix at 12:30 with a +1 mag in it, and a spare +2 mag at 11:30 and not print even with an athletic cut polo on.

    Ammo selection and compatibility with your firearm is paramount. Most guys buy a box of hollow points and never really verify how well they run in the gun. Talk to any good defensive pistol instructor and they will tell you you don't know your gun unless you've run 100-200 rounds of defensive ammo through it, not just FMJ. You'll often find that these smaller guns can be a little picky with feeding hollow points. 1911s especially. I just shot 96 rounds of Federal 124 gr HST through my G43 this week. 1 failure to feed, which I believe was because I limp wristed the shot during a 1 handed drill. Defensive ammo may appear expensive, but you are betting your life on it so you better make sure it performs with the gun you intend to carry.
     
  2. Steelshot Scott

    Steelshot Scott Senior Refuge Member

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    tornadochaser, your post is correct in every aspect.

    However, it is also a prime example of why he should choose a wheelgun. He is not very familiar with handguns, he does not have the training and expertise to clear jams/misfires under stress. The most important factor in a wheelgun is that it never jams, if it misfires, one pull of the trigger and you are back in business.The 38 spl is a proven performer that is better than a 9mm in a lot of ways. The 9mm's main advantage is that it is a tiny bullet and you can fit a lot of them in a mag.

    In reality, most civilian firefights are at a distance of 18 feet and is decided in 3 shots or less. The semi-auto has only two real advantages, that is in quick reloads and mag capacity. In the world of CC self-defense it is an unlikely scenario either will come into play. For someone unfamiliar with handguns, this is a textbook case for a revolver.

    I carry a Glock 36. Only holds 6 in the mag. Because protracted self defense shootings are highly unlikely.

    That being said, I do carry 2 spare mags 'cause I'm paranoid.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
  3. mmayes

    mmayes Diver Forum Mod Moderator

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    My wife and I both carry the G-42 .380 for everyday all day carry as they are light. We both added Night Sites and +2's to the pistol and either of us can effortlessly transition to each others gun should the need arise since they are the same. Not a fan of the .380 but its easy to carry compared to what I would like to (officer SZ 1911) carry when carrying all day long. I had the G-43 with the same add ons but when I did a break in after 100 rounds both my elbows were screaming in pain(they are messed up).

    Carry whatever is comfortable for you to have on you all day. What good is a carry gun if you do not carry it.

    Mayes
     
  4. duckbuster5901

    duckbuster5901 Senior Refuge Member

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    Absolutely find out which ammo , practice and self defense shoots best in what ever you stake your life on. The little 85 I,m partial to loves win 130 grn hollow point self defense loads. Each gun will differ. The one reason I prefer full hammer so that that particular load can be discovered shooting single action first.
     
  5. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    The more I read the more convincing the historical data appears to indicate a large bore bullet is the way to go in that a one-shot kill can be attained.

    Why? Do some research on actual shooting cases and learn the distinctions between shoot-to-kill and stopping the threat. One is justifiable homicide and the other could precipitate murder charges.
     
  6. tornadochaser

    tornadochaser Elite Refuge Member

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    Can you please elaborate on the second sentence?
     
  7. Steelshot Scott

    Steelshot Scott Senior Refuge Member

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    My first handgun was a Ruger Single-Six that my father gave me when I was 11 for shooting snakes. I spent a lot of time in the woods and after a couple of snake encounters, he gave me the gun. I still remember that day, no special occasion, not Christmas or my birthday, I think it was the only present I ever got for no other reason than my Dad felt I needed it. He got up and went to town and came back with it, out of the blue. I cut my teeth shooting that sweet little single action, it sits in my gun safe right now. I think I will shoot it tomorrow.

    I have never really mastered the double action revolver, at least not to my satisfaction. I shoot handguns weekly, I dare say I shoot more accurately than most, but I shoot semi-autos better than I shoot double action revolvers. I own a Colt Trooper Mark III that I like and I always shoot it single action at the range. It is really fun to shoot a single action gun.

    But in a self-defense handgun that will be carried concealed and will be your only handgun, a bobbed hammer gun is preferable. Hammers can snag on clothing. In self-defense, you will shoot the gun double action, you need to practice like you will shoot it in action. You fight like you practice.

    His point is that history has proven large caliber bullets/powerful bullets to be more effective against a threat than small caliber bullets. In the old days they called it "stopping power". Until recently, with the advent of more powerful 9mm ammo, the 45 ACP and the 357 Mag/38 SPL(same bullet as a 9mm in a POWERFUL package) ruled. I have not read the data in years, I know it has changed,but until the 1980's, the 357 was the highest rated "one shot stopper" at 98%. The 45 ACP was at 96%, the 38 SPL was at around 92%. The 9mm was a relatively poor performer around 81%. This was from compiled data from various shootouts.

    It is the reason that people are taught to "double tap" with the 9mm. It is why when there were police shootings with the 9mm, they would have to shoot the aggressor multiple times, bringing in the armchair quarterbacks claiming there was no need to shoot the poor perpetrator 9 times. Except they had to, the 9mm was a notoriously poor performer until fairly recently. The bullet, moving fast, punched through with little felt impact. Back then, it was all about bullet placement and accuracy. Accuracy is often lacking in a self defense scenario. New ammo has made the 9mm more effective.

    The 45 ACP was a slow moving, large bullet. It hit its target arriving on the scene already the diameter of a expanded 9mm hollowpoint. It's slow speed, around 950 fps meant that the bullet did not just punch through, it translated it to felt impact. It didn't deflect off bone, it went through it leaving a large wound channel. It was like being punched. The 357/38 SPL was very effective due to it's powerful loading and the soft lead hollowpoints that were the norm back then.
     
  8. Rangerbob

    Rangerbob Senior Refuge Member

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    Lots of good points on bigger is better calibers. I used to believe it. I carried a Springfield XDS in 45 for awhile but didn't care for the trigger pull and the slab sided feel of the single stack grip. Which caused me to not carry it much.
    The one thing I have learned about CC is that it doesn't matter what you shoot if you don't have it on you you are unarmed. So to me it is more important to have a pistol that you are comfortable carrying than what you are putting down range.
    Most cities have gun shops with ranges that you can try out guns. It is a good idea to go shoot a few and see what you like. Beats the hell out of buying something and then finding out you don't like it.
     
  9. Steelshot Scott

    Steelshot Scott Senior Refuge Member

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    That is a important point, if it is not easy to carry, you won't have it when you need it. It is better to have a .22 in your pocket than a .500 Linebaugh in your nightstand.
     
  10. duckbuster5901

    duckbuster5901 Senior Refuge Member

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    Yes bullet designs have drastically changed the performance of the smaller calibers for the better. And the wheel gun that is handy at night is a 686 357. Lots of punch. When I went thru academy revolvers were still what you trained with and after thousands of double action rounds in combat scenarios you can become quit proficient. Even with those well used Model 10,s a fellow that could shoot to start with could do considerably well. I,ve shot a few autos and do enjoy playing with them but still enjoy the accuracy of a wheel gun w/its favorite ammo.
     

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