Egyptian Wheat

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by KAHunter, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. KAHunter

    KAHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    I want to plant a buffer on one side of my property with egyptian Wheat in NE NC. I will probably get it in next week. This is solely for a buffer, not looking for any food value. I know I am late to the game for EW. How quick does that stuff shoot up, assuming optimum conditions? Will I get a good, tall stand before fall?? Any planting/growing tips on this for just a buffer?? Gonna be around 6-8' wide strip to buffer one side of my pond. Thanks
     
  2. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Elite Refuge Member

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    With my experience a 6-8 ft tall strip isnt nearly enough. Mine was 30 ft wide and after a couple strong winds might as well not been there.
     
  3. KAHunter

    KAHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Really?? That sucks. I thought it was a good strong buffer. Well any ideas on how I can get a buffer about 800' long by this fall?? There are some trees and wax myrtle and such there, but my neighbors burned them up bad with chemicals last year from spraying the adjoining fields and I was hoping to get something in there to buffer a bit more. Thanks
     
  4. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Elite Refuge Member

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    My best buffer was a sudan grass hybrid. I hit it with urea at 6". It was crazy tall and thick. It did thin out as the winter went on. Here it needed to be in the ground around Memorial day.

    For a permanent bufferMiscanthus Giaganteus is all the rage on habitat forums. I refuse to plant it.
     
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  5. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Senior Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    This. I'd look for some sudex.

    And I wouldn't plant giant miscanthus.
     
  6. twall

    twall Senior Refuge Member

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    Sudex or something else that will not produce seed. It loves the heat.

    Tom
     
  7. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    B969D13F-1A5B-4F86-AF4E-449FBF7274C9.jpeg 8A8DCB91-424E-4539-89EA-7C8D802B4925.jpeg It’s a two year proposition but if you think you can keep your neighbor from over spraying I’d go ahead and put some Alamo variety switchgrass seeds in the ground. Won’t do anything for you this year but will produce a tall, thick permanent screen that is extremely hardy and very wildlife friendly. Provides superior erosion control and also is great for brushing blinds.
     
  8. KAHunter

    KAHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    JFG - I like the panicum idea but it wouldnt work here. I have a spot I need to fill in that I may try, but its too shady on the edge of the dyke for panicum. I am planting on a new section of road/dyke to give me a buffer for this year. Just gonna have to stay off it for the season. I am gonna have a good wax myrtle buffer there next year. Had some chemical burn from the neighboring field that hammered my buffer last year. I didnt raise too much fuss but I will next time it happens. I lost buttonbush around our impoundment that are 150 yards from the edge of the bean field that was sprayed. Really hammered my buffer.
    Back to the Egyptian Wheat, I already had ordered it when i did the first post. Gonna give it a try and hope we get something. We will see. Heavy fertilizer will be a must.
     
  9. bbfky

    bbfky Elite Refuge Member

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    KAHunter, if you get decent weather some good rain and hit it several times with Urea you might get 6-8 ft. I have planted it for years. I have some that is around 10ft now and about to head out. Over the years mine has been blown over several times but has always stood back up on its own. If you seed it to heavy then the stalks won't be nearly as strong and will get blown over. It is pretty hardy stuff. now when a snow hits comes it will break and fall over but the doves and turkeys love it. It does take a long time to produce seed but you don't care about that, I try and get mine planted the towards the end of May, this year my crop was all volunteer from last years crop. I have always broadcast mine but wish I had a drill. It does well in dry periods as long as it isn't too thick then it doesn't do great so watch how you plant it. It isn't usually to get 12-13 ft on a good year. Good luck
     
  10. KAHunter

    KAHunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Thanks for the tips. If I can get a good stand at 6' feet tall I would be very happy. What rate do you usually broadcast at? In my research I had figured 15-20 lbs per acre broadcast. I am gonna plant this sunday. How deep do you cover it?? I was going to lightly disc it in but I dont want to go too deep. Thanks
     

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