First season

Discussion in 'Photography Forum' started by IowaWaterfowler10, Jan 4, 2021.

  1. IowaWaterfowler10

    IowaWaterfowler10 Senior Refuge Member

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    This is my first fall working with a dslr. Finally connected on a few images I really like. I think I hit most of them with my ISO too high. I’m really green so suggestions are welcomed. I also have no idea on post processing so I took a shot in the dark there. Enjoy! 2A09FCF3-2FF3-40F0-A7B7-50F5A7F36180.jpeg 5D43591B-8575-43B4-A4E4-2A99F28564CB.jpeg C8BE54B7-AC3C-44DB-9924-1F2C5949341F.jpeg
     
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  2. IowaWaterfowler10

    IowaWaterfowler10 Senior Refuge Member

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  3. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

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    Stunning work. Wow.
     
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  4. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

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    My thoughts...

    I'm not a professional or expert but the colors are perfect. (It's easy to get heavy handed with saturation) and the depth of field (DOF) are also perfect for the shots (I assume that was on purpose).

    The only constructive advice I can give is to pay attention to the background and foreground. The "bloody drip thing" in the spec picture is the only flaw in what could be a magazine cover. The righthand side of the held mallard photo is, again, stunning. The grass in the foreground is distracting as is the messed up feathers on the bird's head.

    It might be me but the last photo is almost cliche but if you wanted to do anything you could level out the photo with the waterline in the background.

    High ISO can lend a pleasing rustic grain to a photo especially with film. High digital ISO doesn't quite capture that feeling but can still add character to a photo and make it seem a little more "timeless". Learn from your "happy accidents".

    The greenwings, boat and dog with the mallard photos are just wow.
     
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  5. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

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    Looking again at the boat picture. I really like the saturation on the mallard decoys. The red on the kill switch is distracting. In photoshop you can de-saturate certain colors. I'd try to tone down the red (without affecting the orange on the mallard hen's bills).
     
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  6. IowaWaterfowler10

    IowaWaterfowler10 Senior Refuge Member

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    This is great advice thank you very much! Broke my heart when I saw the twig in the mallard pic. Can’t believe I missed that through the view finder *face palm*
     
  7. WuChang

    WuChang Elite Refuge Member

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    Saw your post on the Missouri forum
    You have decent beginner gear and you appear to have a pretty good eye

    Gear is only to help you get the images that are in your head but good gear can make things easier.....what you have will make good images with good technique and being where the action is
    Having a good eye and learning a little about composition will help you improve

    The advice about backgrounds and foreground checks is on point but even after years of shooting waterfowl in the wild and catch as catch can........you are going to have twigs,grass and other items get in the way....
    Only thing you can do is see if you can move over to eliminate the item......of course,movement may cost you the shot

    If an editor likes the image,they don’t sweat the small stuff...of course if they have an image they like that doesn’t have the distraction....well,you can guess what one they will use

    I will give you a piece of advice that Dizzy gave me......learn to post process
    There are several programs that are available for reasonable $$$
    Take a class on how to use the program of your choice

    The 7DMKII’s sensor tends to generate “noise” and there are some stand alone products that you could use without a post processing program
    It will blow your mind what can be cleaned up

    as for shooting....look up the “ shoot to the right” concept as far as exposure goes....helps deal not creating noise......but shooting waterfowl in low light...noise is gonna happen but try to minimize it if you can

    all in all....get the shot and worry about the other stuff later

    keep shooting
     
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  8. Steve Borgwald

    Steve Borgwald Elite Refuge Member

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    Great shots and great advice!
     
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  9. IowaWaterfowler10

    IowaWaterfowler10 Senior Refuge Member

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    I have a few friends that take some beautiful photos so I pick their brains as much as possible. I already have my eyes set on the 70-200 f2.8 for next year which I have found seems to be the most commonly used lens for waterfowl. I use Lightroom currently and have used others, but prefer Lightroom. I appreciate the advice thank you!!
     
  10. WuChang

    WuChang Elite Refuge Member

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    70-200 2.8 great lens aka “the journalist lens”

    not wanting to get into a gear thing without knowing what your photo plan/vision is
    But......
    I would recommend that you rent that lens this spring and go to your favorite waterfowl area and see if it is ‘long’ enough for ducks

    I know it would be good for ducks in hand, dogs hitting the water/retrieves, tailgate hero shots etc but you might be surprised at what it takes to get ducks reasonably large in the frame.

    If you shoot basketball or volley ball the advantages to fast glass can be crucial......Overstreet (Wack) has said......you can’t have too much 2.8 glass
     

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