First season

Discussion in 'Photography Forum' started by IowaWaterfowler10, Jan 4, 2021.

  1. IowaWaterfowler10

    IowaWaterfowler10 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2014
    Location:
    Iowa
    I’ve talked to several industry photographers they all say the bigger the better. Also looking at 100-400 but probably will only be able to afford one before season starts next year.
     
  2. Aunt Betty

    Aunt Betty Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,744
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2020
    Location:
    Illinois
    Ive been shooting waterfowl on a national wildlife refuge. Have three cameras.
    Samsung S10 wins?
    Unbelievable.
    I have a gopro 8 and a nikon d3500.
    The cell phone kicks their a.?
    I'm shooting after sunset.
    The phone does best.
    I cant believe it.

    The video is weak and the ducks leave trails. I need to use pro setting in think.
    Plz help me get better im sharing it on this site.
     
  3. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    9,908
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2002
    Location:
    Moncks Corner, SC
    My best/favorite lens is a 70-200mm F4/L IS. I went with this for two main reasons...
    1) It's much lighter than the F2.8 version, and
    2) The lens doesn't change volume with focus or zoom meaning that it doesn't breath-in dust and dirt.

    I do a lot of long distance hiking with my camera so the weight and weather proofing are important.

    The draw backs are the 200mm is very, very short for any wildlife much less birds so I find myself mostly photographing cooperative (ie, dead) ducks...haha...and it's one full f-stop slower than the 2.8 version so I lose speed and bokeh.

    The mitigation on the speed of the lens is that I never miss the DOF of the additional f-stop and each new generation camera usually adds a half to a full f-stop of usable ISO so I get speed boosts whenever I upgrade cameras...that being said, camera/lenses are never fast enough.

    IowaWaterfowler10,
    You've got a "good eye" that's for sure. It's much easier to learn the technical side of photography and post-processing than it is to develop a keen since of what makes a pleasing and interesting photo so you're way ahead of the curve.

    Keep it up, I'm jealous.
     
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  4. IowaWaterfowler10

    IowaWaterfowler10 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    191
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2014
    Location:
    Iowa
    Rubber head, appreciate the kind words BIF I tend to struggle finding a shutter speed to capture it all, while giving me enough light, especially early in the morning. Few examples of the few BIF I’ve got from this year that aren’t complete junk hit it way too high with the iso as you can see there’s lots of grain. Tips welcome for these as well. Again, appreciate all the feedback! A1E24168-9AFA-41E4-BE7C-76E3DFF9355F.jpeg CD41F9CE-F91A-4EF7-A1CB-410920127A6B.jpeg
     
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  5. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2002
    Location:
    Moncks Corner, SC
    With that much light in the background you'll have to set the EV to +1 or more. A low sun angle that lights up the birds but not the sky is perfect but it's fleeting. I think I said in an earlier threat that it's hard to get a good photo in bad light or a bad photo in good light. Learning to recognize good light and not over working yourself in bad light is what good photographers learn to do (I think). The rest of us have to take a lot of photos and throw away almost as many as we take.

    Swans in clean, early light: It was cold and very clear so there was very little color in the sunrise. The sun is still below the swans and pointing up at them and the obtuse angle kept the background sky from underexposing the birds.

    [​IMG]

    A lighted scene with a darkened background. I can only imagine how good this photo would have been if a group of lit-up geese were landing in front of the sycamore. (notice the oof reed in the foreground? ugh...)

    [​IMG]
     
  6. WuChang

    WuChang Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Location:
    the world is home to the Wu Chang Clan
    Example of 100-400 f 4.5- 5.6, the old "dust pump"-- purchased in 2006 and still in use by wife mostly--she will not let me sell it even though I told her the new one was much sharper and it is a twist zoom like most zooms)

    Exif 1DMKIIN (8MP)@ f8 ISO 320 EXComp -1/3 Focal length 400 Aperture Priority Auto WB
    trumpeters_01012021.jpg
    swans-IMG_9726.JPG
    1st camera-- 30D (8mp)-purchased 2006---with same lens 100-400 purchased with 30D)
    hard pan and no light to speak of--reflected light off water from a man made structure across pond--
    thank you Photoshop levels and noise reduction program Noiseware
    EXIF--30D F5.6 @1/200 ISO 800 focal length 400 Aperture Priority Auto WB
    4O3A2140.jpg
    Gray Ghost--male Harrier and only the 2nd one I have ever seen though they say they aren't that rare in the Central Flyway

    Taken a couple of years ago at Bosque with ...yes....the old dust pump on a cloudy and cold overcast day
    EXIf 1DX 1/2000 @5.6 ISO 1600 +2/3- Manual- EXCOMP 400mm focal length WB set to Cloudy



    Best guy using a 7d MKII that I can think of right off hand
    Daniel Cadieux
    http://www.dancadphotography.com/

    His older stuff was eclusively with a 100-400--- his newer stuff is with a 500 F4-- still anyway you look at it--- he is GOOD

    If you are a DU member-- you have seen Michael Furtman's stuff
    Like Cadieux, his old stuff is with a 100-400...his newer stuff is generally with a 500

    BIF gurus
    Aresh Hazegi
    Jim Neiger

    All around probably one of the best of the best
    Arthur Morris
    Birds As Art
    http://www.birdsasart.com/
    His Art of Bird Photography II CD has probably the best explainaition of Exposure for different backgrounds and lighting --
    all the images has his camera setting

    Was a Canon Explorer of Light-- now shoots Sony but the CD is when he was using Canon Gear
    He answers email--- just be ready for a sales pitch along with the information---LOL

    Warning.... do not rent a Canon 500mm F4 or a Canon 600mm F4---
    I learned the hard way ( bought both at different times-- wife uses the 500 and I use the 600)--- hard to go back any else after using them

    This spring rent the lens you are interested in

    rent the 70-200 f4 ( the f4 version is only one stop from the 2.8) and try the 100-400...

    or if you want to see what 600mm looks like in a less expensive package
    Sigma 150-600 sport
    Look up Robert O'Toole and see what he does with the Sigma....and it is a zooom which can be real nice

    Carry on
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2021
  7. Steve Borgwald

    Steve Borgwald Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    11,778
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2000
    Location:
    OH
    Great pics! BTW, find the Harrier and you'll likely find the Short-eared Owl. :)
     
  8. WuChang

    WuChang Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,680
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Location:
    the world is home to the Wu Chang Clan
    yep.......only problem is the short ears I run into don’t come out to play until just after dark and the wife mangled my Better Beamer by sitting her 40D and the 500 on the bag I had it in while trying to fit all the gear in the rear seat of the crew cab LOL
     
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