For the 20ga crowd

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by Larry Welch, May 19, 2021.

  1. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    Going from #3 shot to #5 shot is NOT going up in pellet size. A #5 pellet is SMALLER in dimension that a #3.
    It is only going UP in the pellets designated number, not the pellets actual size. The number is GREATER, the size is SMALLER.

    Yes, we may be in agreement, just have a different definition of "going up a pellet size" (quote from your post).
    To me it means going up in the (physical) size of a pellet.
    Looks like you mean going up in the value of the pellet's designated number ?

    If so, we're all good.
     
  2. Northhunter

    Northhunter Senior Refuge Member

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    Larger pellets will tend to pattern tighter (retained energy, ballistic coefficient, etc. etc.). There will be less pellets hitting the circle (normally), but a higher percentage of the shot charge doing so. A magnum load of #4 or 5 steel can throw a dense pattern without actually being a very good performer percentage wise. It will be a less efficient load.
     
  3. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    Matching the pellets size , to the birds size , on a ballistics chart will give you a good idea , what's ethical amongst serious waterfowlers !
    Forward velocity helps but don't rely on it , as all round balls slow down the faster they are pushed !
     
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  4. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    Nonetheless, what begins faster will always be faster than what begins slower, within the lethal range of those pellets.
     
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  5. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    Even if true (and I'm not sure it is), any amount of "tightening" is far overshadowed by the reduced number of shot in the payload. All else being equal, going down in pellet size (smaller pellets, to be clear) will always result in an increased number of pellets in the payload and in the effective pattern.

    Exactly. This being true, how can the same payload with larger/fewer pellets then provide increased pellet strikes on target??

    Percentages have nothing to do with how many pellets strike the target, unless you are comparing loads with the same shot and payload size. (and we aren't here; we're comparing shot of different sizes) Percentages do not control how many pellets are in the effective pattern; it's the reverse.
    To be clear, percentages are the result of pellets in the effective pattern....the number of pellets in the pattern is not the result of percentages.

    A dense (and even) pattern is the very definition of an efficient load. Dense, evenly distributed patterns are very good performers. Percentages, when you get to the bottom line, are immaterial unless you are comparing identical loads. Even then percentages aren't nearly as important as is pattern distribution.

    Let me give an extreme example:
    If I fired a slug at the patterning board, and managed to hit the 30" circle, I'd have a 100% "pattern". (Even if the "pattern" is less than an inch in diameter.) How good a performer will that slug load be (its legality notwithstanding) as a waterfowl load?
    Answer: not very. I could shoot 50 times at flying ducks using that 100% slug load and likely not hit one bird. And it would the load's fault, because it's a bad performer as a bird load even though it's a "100%" load. High percentage, but still a poor performer.
     
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  6. Joe Hunter

    Joe Hunter Senior Refuge Member

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    When using comparable loads, larger pellets generally tend to pattern tighter (higher percentages) than smaller pellets, but using larger pellets almost always results in fewer pellets in the down-range pattern.

    Of course, the only way to really know how your barrel/choke/load combo performs is to pattern it at the distance you intend to use it. As a side note, I believe it was Brister or Oberfell that said, “percentages don’t kill, pellets do!”

    Here are a few of my pattern numbers comparing No. 7 and No. 6 steel in 20-gauge 2 3/4-inch comparable loads and No. 4, No. 3, and No. 2 steel in 20-gauge 3-inch comparable loads that illustrate the progression of tighter patterns with larger pellets.

    Pattern results from a 20-gauge Browning Citori with 28" Invector-plus barrels using Briley flush chokes (patterns average of five, 30" post-shot scribed circle, yardage taped muzzle to target, and in-shell pellet count average of five).

    20 GA 2 3/4" WINCHESTER XPERT STEEL LOAD
    3/4 oz #7 steel (327 pellets) @ 1325 fps
    20 YARDS – CYL / pattern 251 (77%)
    30 YARDS – CYL / pattern 143 (44%)
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 221 (68%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 242 (74%)
    30 YARDS – M / pattern 272 (83%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 197 (60%)
    40 YARDS – LF / pattern 212 (65%)
    40 YARDS – F / pattern 213 (65%)
    40 YARDS – XF / pattern 222 (68%)

    20 GA 2 3/4" WINCHESTER XPERT STEEL LOAD
    3/4 oz #6 steel (231 pellets) @ 1325 fps
    20 YARDS – CYL / pattern 200 (86%)
    30 YARDS – CYL / pattern 123 (53%)
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 173 (75%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 181 (78%)
    30 YARDS – M / pattern 204 (88%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 155 (67%)
    40 YARDS – LF / pattern 165 (71%)
    40 YARDS – F / pattern 165 (71%)
    40 YARDS – XF / pattern 178 (77%)

    20 GA 3" REMINGTON NITRO-STEEL MAGNUM LOAD
    1 oz #4 steel (191 pellets) @ 1330 fps
    30 YARDS – CYL / pattern 104 (56%)
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 134 (70%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 164 (86%)
    30 YARDS – M / pattern 179 (94%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 147 (77%)
    40 YARDS – LF / pattern 145 (76%)
    40 YARDS – F / pattern 149 (78%)
    40 YARDS – XF / pattern 152 (80%)

    20 GA 3" REMINGTON NITRO-STEEL MAGNUM LOAD
    1 oz #3 steel (152 pellets) @ 1330 fps
    30 YARDS – CYL / pattern 102 (67%)
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 122 (80%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 131 (86%)
    30 YARDS – M / pattern 145 (95%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 114 (75%)
    40 YARDS – LF / pattern 119 (78%)
    40 YARDS – F / pattern 120 (79%)
    40 YARDS – XF / pattern 124 (82%)

    20 GA 3" REMINGTON NITRO-STEEL MAGNUM LOAD
    1 oz #2 steel (118 pellets) @ 1330 fps
    30 YARDS – CYL / pattern 75 (64%)
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 101 (86%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 105 (89%)
    30 YARDS – M / pattern 114 (97%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 99 (84%)
    40 YARDS – LF / pattern 102 (86%)
    40 YARDS – F / pattern 92 (78%)
    40 YARDS – XF / pattern 101 (86%)

    Now you can be the judge!
     
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  7. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator

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    . I consider a 70% pattern ideal at the range you kill the most, so a 70% at 30 yds would be perfect for me. 7/8 is lots. I'd always get 3 or 4 pellets in the bird and same ratio of clean kills to wounded vs heavier shot loads. If you are shooting 40 yds all the time, try to work the birds into better range.
     
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  8. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    upload_2021-5-31_10-11-9.jpeg

    Shot these yesterday for a first blush observation.
     
  9. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    upload_2021-5-31_10-12-6.jpeg
     
  10. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    upload_2021-5-31_10-13-17.jpeg

    These are 28 gauge patterns that I wanted to throw in as well.
     

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