Force Fetch - Meg and Rip - taking baby steps

bwurts

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here is a "progress" video of Meg and Rip - He will easily retrieve two bumpers out to 70-80 yards as part of his regular training, which is separate from his force fetch training. Slow and steady with baby steps -


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bwurts

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Any suggestions that you might have are greatly appreciated - I have never trained a retriever - I have had pointing dogs all my life - I am only the " bird boy" she has done everything else.
 

KwickLabs

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What specifically does the puppy do when returning from a 70 yard mark?
 

bwurts

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good question - on the way back she gives him the heel command - he goes to her left side ( somewhat sloppy meaning not directly beside her all the time sometimes he sits behind her) she gives the out commend, he releases the dummy. -
 

KwickLabs

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somewhat sloppy meaning not directly beside her all the time

Precise practice with many correct "reps" will get rid of "sloppy". Going long tends to erode
responsiveness. Do shorter marks until the returns are precise...distance is not "your friend". :h
 

labrador

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She can practice finishing to her side separate from a retrieve as well. This allows focusing on the aspects of obedience without the distraction of correcting if he drops or otherwise has mouth issues.

When you are throwing marks for her have her back up to a wall or fence. Dog will be forced to finish without going behind her. Mind you, I’m not saying use it as a crutch forever but show him where you want him while taking away the ability to be anywhere else.
 

KwickLabs

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Ah yes, I remember when my young dogs would fly way out there and then come back so
fast it was "look out for your knees time". When this happens most do not recognize the
fact that slowing down is a skill that requires practice. The first thing is to make the returns
short...that way speed is reduced and the pup has a chance to practice the coming to heel
skill at a slower speed. Reducing excitement is a useful training skill.

The following is an example. When learning how to play basket ball, young children start a
few steps from the basket. They don't start far way because they can't run full speed while
dribbling and then time the final last few steps wile being precise enough to take on on the left
leg (if they are shooting right handed). And what if you want the dog to be two sided?

So the pup is fetching close by and maybe retrieving "stuff" using a short lead. This is usually a
very exciting time for a pup. All of a sudden the pup is sent 50-60 yards away with the justification
of "Let's see what he does!" :reader

It is usually an exciting moment. When coming back, the speed will be much greater and excitement
will be more enhanced than ever before. So the next step is a fence to teach the dog to slow down.
Been their and "duh" trainer should have known better (more than once). The fence is crutch. :h

If you look close enough, I was up on my toes ready to dodge the charge. :dv

 

KwickLabs

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This is another young retriever working a drill called the "Zig-Zag" lining drill. The
focus on this drill besides the obvious, alternating lining set up was Gunny needed
work on his deliveries. Being "two-side" is often a useful skill that requires more
practice. Notice he is not as driven as the dog in the first video. This often makes
training seem easier (at times).

 

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