From the Apostles to the Bible

bwurts

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I heard something yesterday day that really got me thinking. the apostles passed down the way of Jesus through their actions - widespread Scripture was not readily available in written form until the 4th century - sure the gospels were written but you could not run down to the copy shop and get the gospels printed to hand out.

so my question is how many of you have studied the "church fathers" who were instrumental in spreading the gospel and putting the " Bible together" what are your thoughts? because there was no widespread written document at the time- it had to be spread and imitated - it was a culture, a way of life - maybe I'm off base in my thinking

I would welcome your thoughts
 

cootmeurer

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Would have to disagree with you on this. Yes the apostles lived the life, but most were martyred relatively soon.

Additionally, as is evidenced by the Rylands fragment, dated possibly as early as 136 AD, the gospels were in papyrus booklet form as far away as Egypt. Papyrus booklets were the “paperbacks” of their time. Rich synagogues had leather scrolls, rich people has leather scrolls, libraries had leather scrolls. Poor folk had papyrus booklets
 

bwurts

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Yes the Apostles - but what about the Apostolic fathers that were taught by the apostles and the generations after that - very few folks were literate at the time. most of the time scribes wrote ( to my knowledge) many of the writings through the apostles. Have any read the Didache? Not familiar with Rylands fragment but will look into it - thanks
 

cootmeurer

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cootmeurer

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Yes the Apostles - but what about the Apostolic fathers that were taught by the apostles and the generations after that - very few folks were literate at the time. most of the time scribes wrote ( to my knowledge) many of the writings through the apostles. Have any read the Didache? Not familiar with Rylands fragment but will look into it - thanks
Again, I would have to disagree. The way we know of the “Apostolic Fathers” (btw - that phrase only dates back to about the late 15th or early 16th century) is through their writings. They wrote letters either to the other churches providing guidance, or they wrote commentary on the gospels. Then also, Paul was quite prolific and wrote many letters. Whether the common man was highly literate may be questionable (although I would support that most males that were members of a church or synagogue were indeed literate in at least 1 language), but clearly church/synagogue leadership was highly literate.

We also tend to make a grave error when we consider only the literature and history that comes down from the West (Alexandrian and Roman) and we forget that a huge repository was preserved in the East (Constantinople and Antioch).
 

Bernie Wurts

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Interesting I would like to read some of your info ie apostolic father term 15th & 16th century, if you could please point me in the direction as to where you’re getting your info I would be happy to read, if you don’t mind sharing

thanks for the feedback
 

Bafarett

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We know from the Gospel that at the beginning of His earthly ministry, the Savior called twelve people who became his disciples and accompanied him throughout the entire time of his ministry, sharing with Him the hardships of nomadic life, shelter, and food. In the church https://firstchurchlove.com, we often discuss the topic of the apostles at meetings, so I know that the disciples were commoners by origin. It is known that some of them were anglers. One, Matthew, was a tax collector before his vocation. At least one of the students, Simon, is known to have been in the ranks of the Zealots before his conversion, an extremist political movement that sought to overthrow Roman rule at any cost.
 

bwurts

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I was recommended a book " The Four Witnesses" The Early Church by Rod Bennet - has anyone read this? or even heard of it?
 

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