I am confused, again........

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by Matt Barnard, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. Matt Barnard

    Matt Barnard Elite Refuge Member

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    In the rate of twist in a rifle barrel, the higher the number, the slower the turn, correct? Sooo, would one want a more aggressive twist, say 1 in 12, for shooting smaller bullets in a 22-250? and the larger number is to stabilize a longer, heavier bullet in the same?
     
  2. derbyacresbob

    derbyacresbob Refuge Member

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    It is the other way around a faster twist would be 1-8" twist because you get one full turn or twist in 8" of barrel. A 1-12" twist is a slower twist it takes 12" of barrel to get one full turn or twist.

    The lower number is a more aggressive twist and you need the lower faster twist number for longer heavier bullets.

    For heavier longer bullets you need a faster twist like maybe a 1-7" to 1-9" twist, for lighter shorter bullets in fast 22 calibers a 1-12" or 1-14" twist maybe all you need.

    Lead free bullets are longer than lead bullets so 22 caliber rifles like the 220 Swift and 22-250 will probable need faster twist rates than 1-12" or 1-14" twist to shoot lead free 55 gr to 62 gr bullets.

    The bullet manufacturers make almost all of the small caliber varmint bullets pretty light so they will be short enough to shoot in the slow rate 1-12" and 1-14" twist barrels.

    I had a 1-8" twist barrel put on my 22-250 so it will stabilize the longer 50 gr to 62 gr lead free bullets.
     
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  3. Ravenanme

    Ravenanme Elite Refuge Member

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    My 6.5/284 has a 8.5 twist so , it stabilizes longer 139's very well , I do shoot 125 Partitions for Deer here but move up when out of state .
     
  4. 10GAGENUT

    10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    I remember reading some of the old large caliber buffalo guns they made in the late 1800's had like 1-16 twist barrels in them for stabilizing such large heavy bullets
     
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  5. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

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    Most .50 sabot muzzleloaders are 1:48 but the traditional round ball shooters prefer 1:60.
     
  6. ALMODUX

    ALMODUX Elite Refuge Member

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    Length of bullet vs bore diameter vs velocity all go into ideal twist rates. Army M16s went from 1:14, to 1:12 (for 55gr), to 1:7 for 62gr and heavier.
     
  7. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

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    I shoot a Missouri River Hawken, in .54, 1:60 twist, with Hornady round ball. It’s incredible how accurate it is at 100 yards and iron sights. I’ve got to where I’ve been shooting it alot, at greater distances at deer during my summer time pest control. Like to make it my exclusive deer rifle but am somewhat reluctant, cause I have experienced a few misfires.
     
  8. Matt Barnard

    Matt Barnard Elite Refuge Member

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    Sooooo, what would the rate of twist be in my Ruger #1, heavy barrel, 26", .22-250?
     
  9. derbyacresbob

    derbyacresbob Refuge Member

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    This is just a guess,1-14" twist.
     
  10. ALMODUX

    ALMODUX Elite Refuge Member

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    It’ll be 1:14 in a #1. 55-60 gr is about as heavy as it’ll stabilize well, depending on shape/material/length. 60gr partitions or 50gr Barnes might be the best ‘heavy’ options. Everything varmint, 55gr and less should stabilize.
     

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