I hate trailer lights.

tcc

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...only by guys who can't execute a proper soldering job.
Says the guy who can't make a quality crimp... ;)

Like it or not, but especially in a high vibration environment like a boat trailer a solid crimp is the superior connection. When done correctly you're cold welding the wire and the crimp (I'll agree that a poorly done crimp is a failure waiting to happen, but so is a poor solder job).
Leave the soldering to mounting components to circuit boards.
 
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Tuleman

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Will trailer light ground to aluminum? Moving mine up from the steel frame to the top of the new aluminum side boards frame. Wondering if I need to extend the ground wire back down to the steel frame.
Aluminum is an even better conductor of electricity than steel.
 

Tuleman

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Like it or not, but especially in a high vibration environment like a boat trailer a solid crimp is the superior connection.
A properly executed solder joint is every bit as durable as a perfectly crimped joint....and far better than a poorly done crimp or even a well-crimped joint using a non-sealed connector.
When done correctly you're cold welding the wire and the crimp (I'll agree that a poorly done crimp is a failure waiting to happen, but so is a poor solder job).
There is no such thing as a "cold weld". A crimp is a mechanical connection.
I have no problem with guys using crimp connectors, if that's what they prefer.
But you and I both know that a proper soldering job will not fail....there may be a method AS GOOD (and it also requires certain hardware and certain skills), but there is nothing BETTER.
Leave the soldering to mounting components to circuit boards.
If crimping was a superior method, components would be crimped to their circuit boards.
Pretty obvious that, when comparing assembly time and durability, a flow-soldered circuit board is the superior product...since they are ALL assembled that way. Even those destined for high-vibration use.
 

tcc

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A properly executed solder joint is every bit as durable as a perfectly crimped joint....and far better than a poorly done crimp or even a well-crimped joint using a non-sealed connector.

There is no such thing as a "cold weld". A crimp is a mechanical connection.
I have no problem with guys using crimp connectors, if that's what they prefer.
But you and I both know that a proper soldering job will not fail....there may be a method AS GOOD (and it also requires certain hardware and certain skills), but there is nothing BETTER.

If crimping was a superior method, components would be crimped to their circuit boards.
Pretty obvious that, when comparing assembly time and durability, a flow-soldered circuit board is the superior product...since they are ALL assembled that way. Even those destined for high-vibration use.
You might want to do a little more research, because you don't know as much as you think you do. :tu You could do some google research, or simply go look at any machine you can find around you--plane, train, automobile, whatever. Come back and tell me how many soldered joints you find..
 

Iammichael6499

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I mostly use high-quality adhesive crimp connectors because I still haven’t learned how to solder worth a flying farkel. One of these days I’ll master the dark art.
 

Tuleman

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That process, though popularly called "cold welding" is not welding, it is bonding. And it sure isn't applicable to wire crimps that you and I could use on our trailer wiring.......
Read that link and you'll see why.

Back to the subject being discussed: you can't beat a properly soldered joint for trailer wiring. A perfect crimp may equal it, but that's all.
 

Kevin Burroughs

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You might want to do a little more research, because you don't know as much as you think you do. :tu You could do some google research, or simply go look at any machine you can find around you--plane, train, automobile, whatever. Come back and tell me how many soldered joints you find..
They use crimp fittings on wiring harness because its cheaper and takes less time. Period.
 

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