I hate trailer lights.

Tuleman

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Why solder instead of crimp? A good crimp is actually considered more reliable.
...only by guys who can't execute a proper soldering job.
Says the guy who can't make a quality crimp...

I think I see where we got off on the wrong foot, tcc.
...and it was probably my fault.

When I posted that first comment, I wasn't referring to you specifically, rather to those people who prefer crimping over soldering. I didn't assume that you thought crimping was superior (although subsequent posts made it clear that I should have).
I think you, then, took it 'personally', when it wasn't meant that way at all. But, I can see how you easily could think I was referring to you.
So, for that, I apologize.

I think we can both agree that a proper solder job and a proper crimp job will both work satisfactorily on our duck boat trailer wiring.
 

Tuleman

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Even in situations where time and money are of little concern, they still crimp.
Hmmmmmm....for the sake of debate, can you give us an example where time and money are of little concern?

I just went through my 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee, and cannot find one crimped connection from the factory.
I also went through my 1984 Chevy hunting truck and the only crimped connections I can find are where some PO tried to install an aftermarket radio. That radio did not work (bad crimps???) when I took possession of the truck, so I replaced it with a new aftermarket radio using soldered connections. After 15 years, the radio still works.
 

oskar

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Years ago I remember a paste that you rubbed into twisted wires and a little heat and it was soldered, no need for flux and a roll of solder. Anyone know what it is called?
 

Tuleman

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Years ago I remember a paste that you rubbed into twisted wires and a little heat and it was soldered, no need for flux and a roll of solder. Anyone know what it is called?
That paste was a mixture of flux and powdered solder. I recall seeing it, but can't remember its name either.
 

California Flyway

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I always solder and use rubberized "splicing tape" to make trailer, boat, and auto wiring connections Just like Fred Fritz taught me many, many years ago.
 

tcc

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When did aviation go from majority soldered to crimped? I haven’t been under a panel since early ‘92, but most joints were soldered at that time.
Couldn't tell you that. A guy in my small group at church is a pilot and owns an aviation mechanic shop, and I used to have a customer that worked on airplane electrical systems in the Air Force in the 90's (helped him build a new harness for an old Jeep). I've discussed wiring quite a bit with both of them as I was looking at building a new harness for my Landcruiser, so I'm going by what they both said and what I've read (I went down a bit of a rabbit hole with it and read a ton of stuff about wiring and harness building).
 

tcc

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I think I see where we got off on the wrong foot, tcc.
...and it was probably my fault.

When I posted that first comment, I wasn't referring to you specifically, rather to those people who prefer crimping over soldering. I didn't assume that you thought crimping was superior (although subsequent posts made it clear that I should have).
I think you, then, took it 'personally', when it wasn't meant that way at all. But, I can see how you easily could think I was referring to you.
So, for that, I apologize.

I think we can both agree that a proper solder job and a proper crimp job will both work satisfactorily on our duck boat trailer wiring.
Meh, no worries, I probably came off as more bothered that I really was or am. It's just something that I've tinkered with and done a good bit of reading and discussion with folks about. Based upon that I do in fact believe that a good crimp is the better connection in environments like cars, boats, trialers, etc---when done correctly they tend to stand up to the heat, vibration, etc better. That said, I'm not saying, or didn't intend to say, that a proper soldered joint is bad, rather that a crimp is preferable, and soldering isn't some holy grail like some make it out to be.

A poorly made crimp, with crappy tools and cheap connectors, is junk I'll give you that. But I'll argue that so is a poor solder job, and the guy who uses the former isn't likely to do any better with the latter. For most people a solid crimp is also easier done than a good solder job (and yes, especially in a production environment).

And attaching wires to circuit boards is really a whole different animal and not what I'm referring to; just because solder is ideal there doesn't mean it's so for other type connections.
 
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tcc

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Hmmmmmm....for the sake of debate, can you give us an example where time and money are of little concern?

I just went through my 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee, and cannot find one crimped connection from the factory.
I also went through my 1984 Chevy hunting truck and the only crimped connections I can find are where some PO tried to install an aftermarket radio. That radio did not work (bad crimps???) when I took possession of the truck, so I replaced it with a new aftermarket radio using soldered connections. After 15 years, the radio still works.
:scratch :scratch :scratch

I've spent more time under a hood than most guys on here and I don't think I've ever seen a soldered joint in a vehicle, and if I have it's been very rare. Other than on circuit boards virtually every splice, terminal, pin connector, etc I've messed with has been crimped. Same goes for virtually every piece of machinery I've ever worked on.
I'm sure there are some instances where you'll find a soldered joint, but they're the minority for sure.
 
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Scott yellowdog

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I used to wire semi-trailer light systems and you would think that it would get easier. Wiring a new trailer(Kit) for lights and one side works the other doesn't except for the side marker. I'm sure it is a ground issue. Back out into the cold and wind.

It was the ground, all fixed

I'm putting together a rig to haul my canoe and Marshrat, I'm getting too old to lift them up on the top of my van, will post pics when its done.
Man I'm wid you bought a brand new xpress had lights everywhere loved it my lab saw a bird go in the end by hitch she shredded my wiring. Ain't all worked right since got pulled over one evening on way back from fishing lol
 

Gmack

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ah the age old crimp versus solder debate. TO me either is fine. I just crimp because not good at soldering and it's not convenient to do under a trailer.
 

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