Impoundment Development Question

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by THEIRCOMMITED10, Aug 13, 2019 at 6:12 PM.

  1. THEIRCOMMITED10

    THEIRCOMMITED10 |Moderator Fishing|Call Sponsor| Sponsor Moderator

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    I have a property I am looking to develop an impoundment for ducks and geese . Approximately 4-5 acres . I know some of you have been through the massive headaches to get to the fruit of your labor so I figure it’s a good place to ask .

    I’m not 100% green but I’m no where near an expert. I’ve done a small impoundment from scratch in the past it was only a small .75 acre flooded corn and some half *** millet spot ... but it was easy . It was basically set up on a tee to build . 100% clay soil and 50 feet from a water source to pump and right on the farm with all the equipment .

    Anyways , getting into the meat and potatoes . My best bet on this potential spot is a portion of the property is Granby sandy loam 0-2 percent slopes . Water table is labeled 0-12” but we dug some 5’ test holes today it seems a fuzz lower and it filled with water after a just few minutes . The hydrologic soil group is A/D . Hydric soil rating YES .

    My biggest question I am wondering about is wether to play the land /wallow out a shallow bowl shaped deal that’s dry enough in summer to plant but can hold water in fall time when table is up #1 or #2 build a Levy type impoundment . But my biggest concern is I don’t know if a levy will work however with that kind of sandy soil as water stoppers . Because science says it’s an A class when dry . When wet it’s a D class .

    My next thing Im debating is what the better move is if I dig a well on site with that high water table it might not be too bad . Or I build a 1 acre pond adjacent to the flooded corn (4 acres) which I’d like to do anyhow on the property for the goose hunting and then pump from the pond to get some water onto to the corn . Probably just 12”-14” of water . I was told the neighbor (non hunter) can pump out of his pond and it will refill quickly I’m guessing it’s a water table pond also .

    The other portion of the property is Oakville Fine sand 1 to 6 percent slopes . Depth of water table is listed 80” and rated soil group A . Hydric soil rating NO . I wonder how much water I will loose instantly if the two soil types over lap in the impoundment .
    I’m guessing I will have to choose wisely if I want to blend those together or don’t even include it in the impoundment .

    Thankyou for your time . God Bless and Good Huntin’ .
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019 at 6:43 PM
  2. Greekangler

    Greekangler Senior Refuge Member

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    A/D is risky. If you’ve dug test holes all over 5 acre area should be fine. It will probably take 2x water to flood early season before water table is higher. I actually passed on purchasing piece w B/D soil because clay was just too sandy. Make sure your levee is down to clay. The soil surveys are not always super accurate. They are map based. Poking holes is best bet on bordering changes in soil types.
     
    THEIRCOMMITED10 likes this.
  3. THEIRCOMMITED10

    THEIRCOMMITED10 |Moderator Fishing|Call Sponsor| Sponsor Moderator

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    Thank-You for the reply GreekAnger I appreciate it .

    Could you elaborate when you say make sure the levee is down to the clay . Assuming you mean when keyholed ?
     
  4. THEIRCOMMITED10

    THEIRCOMMITED10 |Moderator Fishing|Call Sponsor| Sponsor Moderator

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    As far as levees go , has anyone attempted to build levees on A/D rated soil ? How did it hold water ? Thankyou for your time
     

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