it’s not about weather. It’s private & public duck hotels up north

Discussion in 'Louisiana Flyway Forum' started by borntohunt, Nov 9, 2019.

  1. ducaholic

    ducaholic Elite Refuge Member

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    But it is relevant to our discussion regarding the unintended flooding of unharvested crops. I wonder how much marginal farm land that would qualify for WRP is still out there? Land that should have never been cleared to begin with and we continue to support the farmer to farm via the farm bill and all it's perks.
     
  2. Cliner

    Cliner Elite Refuge Member

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    Contrary to many opinions about "public tax dollars paying for high falootin duck places", even marginal farm ground will out produce the going rate for a WRP contract, without having to relinquish any type of control to the government and the fact that WRP is now only offered in perpetual contracts.
     
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  3. ducaholic

    ducaholic Elite Refuge Member

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    Hadn't heard that phrase in a while but since you mentioned it public tax dollars do pay for high falottin duck places in one way or the other.
     
  4. LADucks

    LADucks Senior Refuge Member

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    WRP rates would have to drastically increase. Then we'd be paying way too many tax dollars for smart landowners to keep "duck paradises". I think that's counter-productive to our issue and is a solution that works against our problem. That's a reason nobody is letting marginal crop land go or is buying up all available. They're banking on WRP increasing one day. CRP is done in 5-10-15etc yr terms for the purpose of taking farmland out of rotation so the market isn't flooded. You have an option of returning once term is up. WRP has same purpose, but wayyy more restrictions for what you can do with it, and its forever. Once its a thicket bottom, it stays a thicket bottom. It's use then is for hunting only. Once hunting is a top priority, every concession available is made by that landowner to make it as private/attractive as possible. I'd rather them trying to farm it myself. Most years it'll just be harvested fields that may or may not have water, rather than a giant swath of flooded moist soil every single year.
     
  5. ducaholic

    ducaholic Elite Refuge Member

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    I thought only a small percentage of a WRP tract could be managed as a moist soil unit?

    I read 5% somewhere.
     
  6. LADucks

    LADucks Senior Refuge Member

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    The 5% refers to purposefully planted food plots, like a giant millet field. You're allowed to manage/disk/cut/etc lots of other shallow water areas (natural stuff), just apparently not choose what to plant. They even require you to leave a certain amount of residue when you disk/cut. It's all very controlled though. Only authorized to do this in that zone or that in this zone, etc. You lose a lot of control, but if the land is for nothing other than hunting, it's a good deal. Here's a PDF with some guidelines:

    https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs142p2_009393.pdf
     
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  7. JHerr

    JHerr Elite Refuge Member

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    Not correct.
    30-yr is still available in LA. Values based on 80% FMV for perpetual with 100% restoration included, 30-yr is not that generous - much lower "bonus" and landowner partially pays for restoration.

    I'd say the Gov is pretty competitive on CRP and WRP compared to current rents on non-irrigated "WRP-quality" land (again, In LA.)
     
  8. JHerr

    JHerr Elite Refuge Member

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    Landowner pays 75% of restoration on 30-yr easement.
     
  9. Bryce Berg

    Bryce Berg Refuge Member

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    I do find it somewhat ironic that I’m probably “trolling” when I have my real name as my title and have dropped my personal email to use to exchange numbers to talk on the phone without some username to hide behind. Wuchang seems to comment on every post yet I doubt anyone knows who he is. After berating me and my information as trolling, I thought he would have been the first to want to exchange information so that he could inform me about all of his facts. My info is still up there and I am genuinely interested in hearing the argument from the supporters on the phone without an hour to think out your response via text as I truly want to have all my information straight for the future.
     
  10. Cliner

    Cliner Elite Refuge Member

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    The facts are everywhere in here. Plenty of data refutes the premise that MO, specifically, is holding up ducks. If they were, the data would show a significant uptick in harvest numbers for the state. Conversely, it shows that MO is having similar issues as LA. Less ducks harvested and less ducks being reported. In fact, Arkansas is the one that seems to continue doing well.

    There are other studies that show that birds of all species in the northern hemisphere, not just North America, are not migrating as far south. I've linked this study before (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5154525/), though I imagine most or all did not actually read it. I have posted others in the forum as well.

    I'm curious, you said you have land by sumner. I used to lease around that area and have friends that still do. One that borders a flooded cornfield that rarely shoots or holds ducks. I'm sure you've seen ducks not using cornfields that were flooded, and I know dang good and well that if you have spent a good amount of time up there, you've seen that grand river flood right during/before harvest time.
     

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