Mid-Barataria

Discussion in 'Louisiana Flyway Forum' started by bill cooksey, Apr 8, 2021.

  1. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    This man loves Louisiana.
    FB_IMG_1617914968312.jpg
     
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  2. Gmack

    Gmack Senior Refuge Member

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    Yes!
    I read the entire information package about it. It was a lot, but a good read. I spend every day possible during the summer fishing Grand Isle and Fourchon. It’s a little scary to think about the immediate impact, but truly feel the long term outcome is worth it.
     
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  3. DComeaux

    DComeaux Elite Refuge Member

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    I saw where you were attacked on FB when you posted this article. If you hadn't noticed the loudest one appears to be a fishing guide down there. I know diversion and restoration work will affect some commercial fisheries but I know doing nothing should not be an option.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
  4. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    Yeah, and I don't necessarily blame them, but I wish they'd all just be honest about it.
     
  5. Engstfeld

    Engstfeld Elite Refuge Member

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    Fishermen hate anything that lowers salinities. Foxtrot ‘em.
     
  6. JJVizinat

    JJVizinat Senior Refuge Member

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    I’ve come to realize many Louisianians are their own worst enemy. I love our state and our people but we’ve brought a lot of this on ourselves. If anyone can’t accept that, then they’re not even ready to start having a conversation about conservation or restoration.
     
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  7. borntohunt

    borntohunt Senior Refuge Member

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    The state claims they will re-train everyone being put out of the fishing business. No man should be put out of business. Plus, the fishermen made some good arguments about how this hasn’t worked in other areas. It’s easy to be in favor of something that puts another man out of business. You have nothing to loose.
     
  8. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    They really haven't made that argument. A sediment diversion is not a freshwater diversion. They don't operate the same. When your business has you shrimping where your grandfather hunted rabbits, there's something wrong.
     
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  9. DComeaux

    DComeaux Elite Refuge Member

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    Nothing to lose? How about the bottom half of the state that my grandchildren may not get a chance to see or enjoy as I did.
     
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  10. DComeaux

    DComeaux Elite Refuge Member

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    That is correct. Much of the Chenier plain issues stem from the abandoned and unrestored leveed cattle pastures south of 82.
    This is from the link I've attached.
    "The coast of Louisiana is divided into two distinct geologic regions: the Deltaic Plain and the Chenier Plain. The Chenier Plain stretches from the Sabine River on the border with Texas eastward to Vermillion Bay. This wetland ridge is made up of mostly ancient shell beaches, old tree lines, and firm marshes. Cameron Parish holds the largest area of marshland in the Pelican state. As seen on a map, the Chenier region is slightly curved and relatively smooth, not frayed, compared to the “Birdfoot” Delta region. Its sediment structure is more stable and therefore suffers less from natural subsidence than its sister region to the east. These unique geological features allow the wetlands of the Chenier Plain to absorb, adapt to, and support man-made activities more naturally than in the Deltaic Plain. See G.M. Gomez, A Wetland Biography. Seasons on Louisiana’s Chenier P"

    Flying over our marshes for years I've always wondered if the maze of excavated oil field canals would eventually have a negative impact on our marshes. This is copied from the attached paper.
    "Casting an eye at more than 9,000 miles of oil field canals, nearly 4,000 active platforms servicing 35,000 wells, and 29,000 miles landing across the Louisiana coast, many people have rushed to convict the oil industry as destroyer of the marsh." "3 Scientists account for the period of most rapid land loss between 1955 and 1980, the era of intense offshore oil activity".

    This says it all.
    "The political, environmental, and financial issues involved in such projects, however, pose enormous challenges to the lawmakers and discouraged stakeholders of coastal Louisiana who continue to watch in disbelief as the wetlands and all that they support – energy infrastructure, coastal communities, and wildlife habitat – slowly erode toward the sea with each passing tide.

    https://typriest.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/who-destroyed-the-marsh.pdf
     

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