No water

salthunter

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Living in the West, water has become a bigger and bigger issue. Some of you may have seen the pictures of Lake Mead and what has happened to Lake Mead in Nevada.

Our water system just got this notification. There Are Places on the upper Snake River plain or the water table has dropped 1000 feet because of farmers pumping water.
There were places in the desert that had water year round.


Dear Patron:
Due to the drought in our area******** ******** Water Corporation just received the attached curtailment letter from the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR). This is what it means. All patrons on our system are to discontinue using water from our system for exterior irrigation effective May 20, 2022 until notified otherwise. Some exterior use is allowable such as watering stock, washing a car,etc, but all irrigation for lawns is not allowed under this curtailment. Lawns, gardens,and pastures are to be irrigated with the water from Fort Hall Irrigation District. This action has been taken to help preserve groundwater levels for crops and other essential uses. Let's hope and pray that adequate precipitation will come to our area this summer.

If you have any questions or concerns please notify a member of the board.
 

Dirk Van Schmaldlerson

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Weird. Trying to grow crops in a semi arid environment would require supplemental water sources? Who would have thought. To catch a phrase from Nazi, round things roll and water is wet, these are all things we know.
 

Woodduck31

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Only a couple areas of Idaho are short of average, the Henry's fork and Bear river which are both above 80%. Most of the rest of the state is well above normal, yet the talk of drought still is prevalent in the "news". One problem does exist, way more water usage in a state that is growing fast. The bigger question is probably not what is average, but how has the water demand risen. I've seen quite a few drought years over the past 30 years, this isn't one of them, at least in most of the state of Idaho. Only a few short years ago they were flooding the lower treasure valley because we had too much water. Those of us who live along the Snake River belt live in a desert of sage brush and tumbleweeds, if you don't put water on it in the summer things don't grow.
 

noweil

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Chicago pumped the aquifer down over 900 feet. They were lucky enough to be on the shore of Lake Michigan so they now drink lake water.
 

BigSkyDuk

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So they'll let you wash a car but not water a lawn? That seems off base to me.

I think the point a couple of you have made, that drought/water levels are VERY local, is one that more people need to understand. If you look at the NOAA maps, entire western states are in drought; but if you are on the ground in those states conditions vary considerably from one drainage to the next. That's not to say that overall drought conditions don't exist in much of the west, but that most people lack any nuance around what's actually going on.

One thing that's certainly helping us, at least in my drainage, is several late snows and a very cool spring. I would imagine for the guys in ID on the other side of the mountain range they could say the same.

Droughts happen and there have been and will be dry years. It's one reason, IMO, that dams should not be breached. We need the ability to store and manage water flows between cycles. That's especially true as more people move here and create more demand on the resource.
 

Idahotim

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So they'll let you wash a car but not water a lawn? That seems off base to me.

I think the point a couple of you have made, that drought/water levels are VERY local, is one that more people need to understand. If you look at the NOAA maps, entire western states are in drought; but if you are on the ground in those states conditions vary considerably from one drainage to the next. That's not to say that overall drought conditions don't exist in much of the west, but that most people lack any nuance around what's actually going on.

One thing that's certainly helping us, at least in my drainage, is several late snows and a very cool spring. I would imagine for the guys in ID on the other side of the mountain range they could say the same.

Droughts happen and there have been and will be dry years. It's one reason, IMO, that dams should not be breached. We need the ability to store and manage water flows between cycles. That's especially true as more people move here and create more demand on the resource.
Here in idaho people want to breach the dams for fish , not realizing that they create power that is more sustainable than their wind power,and there solar power, but the fishing guides and the Indians want them removed. Personally I feel that if the Indians remove all the guil nets that so thick all across the Columbia River you could walk across you would see more fish, I also believe that it's not our job to provide a living for guides at the expense of taxpayers for higher energy costs to tare down dams. Not to get into just off the coasts of the US 200 mile boundary that you have China, Japan and who ever else over fishing international waters. Dams are not only a source of renewable energy but put in for flood control,and comrece for commercial supplies, the greater good comes from dams versus not.
 

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