No water

Northhunter

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Why do the Native Americans still get to use gill nets? Have they not heard of grocery stores? I'm serious as this subject really bothers me, honestly not being a racist (because I ain't white) just asking.
Hot topic of debate up here as well.
What's ironic is a lot of the people that like to bitch and moan about it, also buy the fish they net.

When walleye stocks were down, there was a lot of public/stakeholder opinion that stocking should increase (on a massive scale, on top of a naturally viable population). The population was fine, all we had to do was leave it alone a little while and it would rebound. That was too simple for a lot of people, apparently.
Luckily the MNR put their foot down and weathered the storm. If the "stakeholders" got their way, likely would have F'd things up, big time... and pointed fingers at the natives the whole damn way.
 

Idahotim

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Why do the Native Americans still get to use gill nets? Have they not heard of grocery stores? I'm serious as this subject really bothers me, honestly not being a racist (because I ain't white) just asking.
They get to use them because it is part of the ancestral heritage protected by treaties. They are out dated IMO.
 

Dirk Van Schmaldlerson

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By that logic we should plow under all the farms in the midwest and tear down the levees on the Mississippi; after all, they enable people to live in places where they otherwise wouldn't be able to live, at least in current numbers. Free flowing waters from the Columbia Basin are on a fast track to the Pacific Ocean where they do nobody any good at all. What level of resource capture and use should we engage in?
I’m not denying anything you’re saying. What I’m saying is it’s a part of the problem outlined in this post. Ag on sub par land that requires constant moisture supplementation is undoubtedly one of the players in aquifers being depleted. Same is true for large populations of people gathered in ANY one area.
 

Clark

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duckbuster5901

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I’m not denying anything you’re saying. What I’m saying is it’s a part of the problem outlined in this post. Ag on sub par land that requires constant moisture supplementation is undoubtedly one of the players in aquifers being depleted. Same is true for large populations of people gathered in ANY one area.
Kind of brings to mind Date groves in Yuma, Arizona. Middle of a desert, if you see green anywhere it means its irrigated. Water I believe comes clear from Calif. to irrigate these crops via pipelines and fields are graded and trenched to let water move gently down rows and not run off. They have to sign up to receive x amount of gallons to irrigate and then water is shut off. Just seems more logical to me to plant these crops where water is readily available but what do I know!
 

Traxion

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By that logic we should plow under all the farms in the midwest and tear down the levees on the Mississippi; after all, they enable people to live in places where they otherwise wouldn't be able to live, at least in current numbers. Free flowing waters from the Columbia Basin are on a fast track to the Pacific Ocean where they do nobody any good at all. What level of resource capture and use should we engage in?
Humankind has yet to learn how to balance use of resources. I have no sympathy for a farmer who runs out of water farming the desert, nor do I have sympathy for someone who lives in a flood plain. Mother nature still rules. In SD, the Missouri River flood of 2011 flooded out people who built directly below the Oahe Dam. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. I am all for responsible use of water and resources, including hydropower. But when I see farmers in the desert growing cotton on irrigation because it is the only crop (due to government support) they can make a living on there, I have a problem. No different that the endless expansion around St. George Utah. Endless golf courses in the desert. The examples go on and on.

Water use is like a checking account. You have deposits (runoff) and charges (human use, evaporation, etc.). Many areas are using/ charging more to the account than what is being deposited, thus the problem. But nobody is willing to stop spending. I'm afraid it's just going to come down to the junior water users just getting slow choked out. It's already beginning. Sad but until we can balance the checkbook of water, someone is going to lack it. The tough part is saying who that should be.
 

nebgoosehunter

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Has anyone heard about Nebraska wanting to take water from the South Platte River in Colorado via a canal and take it back into Nebraska? We (as in my state of NE) feel like the booming population of Denver and the Front Range will keep using more and more water thus making flow into Nebraska on the South Platte less and less. Our state invoked a right from the 1920's in the South Platte River Compact to build such a canal to move water in the offseason from Colorado into Nebraska and store it in reservoirs. Our legislature passed this bill and plans to move forward with the project, but I know it will be tied up in litigation for quite some time. I don't work with surface water but I work directly with groundwater and farmers so I am in this field and know it all too well. Farmers in our district have water allocations, but with rotations and irrigation technology, most of our farmers stay within their allocation.
 

salthunter

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Why do the Native Americans still get to use gill nets? Have they not heard of grocery stores? I'm serious as this subject really bothers me, honestly not being a racist (because I ain't white) just asking.

They get to use them because it is part of the ancestral heritage protected by treaties. They are out dated IMO.

I get too wired about the whole treaty thing,,, But lets just say its working out well for the Native population
They truly are privilaged beyond normal. Some recognize it, many deny it.
A friend couldn't farm for 2 years because arrowheads were found, the acreage was then considered as reservation.
Free housing, free healthcare, food cards, no taxes, free
( or even paid to go to school) sovereign governing,,,,,,,, The most free people in the US

BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The Idaho Department of Fish and Game won't recognize as a state record a trophy bighorn sheep killed by a Nez Perce Tribe member the agency says was taken outside its hunting regulations.
But the Boone and Crockett Club not only recognizes the Rocky Mountain bighorn killed by Gary Sublett in 2016, it has invited him to its annual awards ceremony this summer in Missouri.
A treaty the Nez Perce Tribe signed with the U.S. Government in 1855 allows Sublett to hunt ancestral tribal areas in Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Montana.

Boone and Crockett says it recognizes Sublett's ram killed in Hells Canyon because of the treaty and because the tribe has a management plan for sustainable hunting of bighorns.

the owners of Mystic Lake Casino Hotel and Little Six Casino – ,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, each member earns approximately
$1.08 million annually. (Not to mention, living on reserved land makes the income tax-free.)
 

JoJer

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Since I've been hearing more and more about reparations for slave's ancestors, I keep thinking that Natives should go to the head of the line.
The four dams in the Simpson plan are old and inefficient. BPA can't afford to make Federally required repairs and improvements. If you look at the "green" plan going forward, those industries mentioned above-barges, wheat farming, are all about to have their pins kicked out from under them just as was done to the gas and oil industry. I've seen the electric semi tractors and heard a little about the E farm equipment. Man, they are pricey. Are owner operators going to get $1million dollar loans to buy in? They going to get trade in on their diesels that you can't buy fuel for? How about electric tugs for the barges? They ship some grain by train but the locals aren't real happy with increased rail traffic. Particularly when that mile-long train includes bulk pollutants traveling right next to waterways. Speaking of the trains, that's a bit of infrastructure that needs a lot of attention. High speed electric rail in the US is the jet pack fantasy we old guys heard about in the 60's.
Meanwhile, BPA and the Corps keep dinking around in court. I'm fairly sure their lawyers can drag this out 'til the fish are gone.
 
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