OT hiking in questions around deer hunting

nsm1548

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Water filter is a gamechanger IMO.
Scout your spot, a lot if possible, learn the landscape.
Carry a sidearm.
I will have a side arm during scouting and was debating during the season. Do you carry on your thigh while backpacking? Watched a bear charge back at a guy in Tahoe this weekend after he chased it out of his truck. It ran off after some banging with the branch he had.
 

nsm1548

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If you have a smart phone you have a gps already. You can download the maps to your phone and use gps even if you don’t have service. I use my phone for a lot of things that years ago took multiple items…. Look on rokslide and other forums for gear list and time of year. You’ll get a sense of items guys use that have done solo hunts and what they deem necessary. You can make it as comfortable or as miserable as you would like, all comes down to how much you want to carry.
My major concern with my phone is battery life. Also don’t some of the GPS have satellite text. I figured that could be useful in a injury type situation. Maybe if I’m with another person the phone will work.
 

freefall

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A sleep system is just that. A 20 degree bag will end up being a 60 degree bag if you don’t get the appropriate sleeping pad.

Have a good first aid kit with items you know how to use. Make sure it’s somewhere you can reach and use with 1 hand if needed.

Consider a Garmin in reach mini. Getting a txt out can save a life.

Try the meals you plan on eating at home. Not all are created equally and some may mess up your stomach.

Be prepared to process and pack out an animal. Good knives, cordage & game bags.

Have a good foot care kit. Good socks / boots / powder & leukotape are key.

Have multiple lighters and fire starting equipment.

Upgrade your tent stakes & get a footprint for your tent.

Hydration is critical at elevation. Even more so than normal. As mentioned, have a good filtration system and stay hydrated. I’d recommend having electrolytes with you as well.

Have rain gear. The sierras are unpredictable and getting wet can lead to hypothermia quickly.

There’s too much to list but that’s a base list of things to look at.
 

nsm1548

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Where are going and what time of year?
I’ll scout in late July and August hunt in late September early October. I’m in D3-5 (scouting d3) and know it’s reputation for being a war zone and not the best hunting so really just looking to get away by hiking in and at least hopefully enjoying my trip and learning some things. Started that way duck hunting while in Chico and have had the addiction since. I tell my wife it’s a hobby not addictions.
 

freefall

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I will have a side arm during scouting and was debating during the season. Do you carry on your thigh while backpacking? Watched a bear charge back at a guy in Tahoe this weekend after he chased it out of his truck. It ran off after some banging with the branch he had.

Thigh rigs suck for extended walking. Get a chest rig or holster you can attach to your pack belt.
 

nsm1548

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A sleep system is just that. A 20 degree bag will end up being a 60 degree bag if you don’t get the appropriate sleeping pad.

Have a good first aid kit with items you know how to use. Make sure it’s somewhere you can reach and use with 1 hand if needed.

Consider a Garmin in reach mini. Getting a txt out can save a life.

Try the meals you plan on eating at home. Not all are created equally and some may mess up your stomach.

Be prepared to process and pack out an animal. Good knives, cordage & game bags.

Have a good foot care kit. Good socks / boots / powder & leukotape are key.

Have multiple lighters and fire starting equipment.

Upgrade your tent stakes & get a footprint for your tent.

Hydration is critical at elevation. Even more so than normal. As mentioned, have a good filtration system and stay hydrated. I’d recommend having electrolytes with you as well.

Have rain gear. The sierras are unpredictable and getting wet can lead to hypothermia quickly.

There’s too much to list but that’s a base list of things to look at.
Thanks for the advice, I would of forgotten powder and tape. And I need to look into stakes for the tent. Think I’m going with a non air pad that could also be used for glassing.
 

hunt'ngreen

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Good points as always above, give those quick-stix a look by wiser, they fit on your trekking poles, don't way squat, and save you from carrying shooting sticks, have had a set for several years, works well.
 

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