poundage for primitive equipment

Discussion in 'Bow Hunting Forum' started by waterrat, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. waterrat

    waterrat Elite Refuge Member

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    A friend of mine is renown for his primitive bows. I was lucky to pick one up at a silent auction a while back. I've shot it some and enjoy it thoroughly. It's a 5ft bamboo backed/ bois d'arc that pulls 38# @ 26". Its legal for deer in Ok., but I'm not sure its snappy enough. Who shoots big game with old school equipment 20190826_212735.jpg what are you shooting?
     
  2. widgeon

    widgeon Elite Refuge Member

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    I don't hunt with them anymore , but I have a 47# recurve and a 61# longbow.
     
  3. WoodieSC

    WoodieSC North/South Carolina Flyway Forum Moderator

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    I don’t use a recurve anymore, but when I did it was a 58”(?) long, 48# @ 28”.

    I’m many States I believe the minimum is 40-45#’s. If that one is legal in OK, just limit the distance.

    Happy hunting!
     
  4. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Senior Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    Depends on how it stacks but if it's 38# @ 26 I'd think it would be 44-45# @ 28.

    I shoot a recurve but don't hunt with it. Thinking about giving up the compound next year and going all traditional.
     
  5. WoodieSC

    WoodieSC North/South Carolina Flyway Forum Moderator

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    I’m rusty on the details, but (depending on the stack) I believe you only get 1-2#’s per 1” of draw. Don’t mean to argue, just clarifying the question for the OP.

    Get it tested at an archery shop and they’ll be able to tell you exactly what the poundage is at your specific draw length. And make sure of the string quality as a good one can give you a little extra ‘zip’.
     
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  6. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Senior Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    I thought it was bow dependant to how the stack amounted. Longer bow stacks slower but depending on the build it can change.

    I'm far from an expert with traditional equipment tho. I know compounds pretty well.
     
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  7. Archeryrob

    Archeryrob Elite Refuge Member

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    You should be able to tell by how the arrow penetrates the target. If you can get a couple inches in the target, it going to kill a deer with good placement. 38# is a bit light and I have used 45# recurves and 55# selfbows.

    I'll never forget, 10 years or so back I went to one of these primitive get togethers and they guys are all shooting their bows, talking about how they would hunt with it. They were shooting the target. I shot one and my arrow buried fletching deep. I figured I hit a soft spot. Second arrow went through and fell loosely on the ground behind the target. I said wait and check the target and it was 5 sheet of corrugated cardboard. :eek: My felching was crushed on both arrows. They said "Wow, you got a really strong bow!" I said "No, you all need to learn to make better bow and targets and I wouldn't hunt with those bows."

    I want to go back to my primitive bow and arrows, but I have so many other things I am doing and working to dedicate that kind of practice time.
     
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  8. WoodieSC

    WoodieSC North/South Carolina Flyway Forum Moderator

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    You make a very good point. I don’t know where that ‘stack curve’ sits.
     

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