Proposed Changes to Possession Regulations

Discussion in 'Canadian Hunters Forum' started by 870, Jun 10, 2019.

  1. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    The following passages comes from http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2019/2019-06-01/html/reg3-eng.html

    "Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 153, Number 22: Migratory Birds Regulations.

    June 1, 2019...


    ...New concept of possession — concept of preservation introduced

    ...The new proposed concept of possession is that once birds are preserved according to the criteria set out in the amended MBRs, they no longer count in an individual’s possession limit. This would encourage hunters to preserve birds for future use, thus avoiding waste. A bird would be considered preserved when it is

    • plucked and eviscerated (or the edible portions removed from the carcass), and then;
    • frozen, cooked, dried, canned or smoked, or when mounted for taxidermy..."


    "Requirement to retain fully feathered wing or fully feathered head of unpreserved birds

    ...It is proposed that the hunter have the choice to retain either the fully feathered head or a fully feathered wing to remain attached to unpreserved carcasses for identification purposes...
    ...This requirement would only apply to unpreserved birds, when they are still in the hands of the hunter who harvested them, or are in temporary custody, or have been gifted. It is important to note that a bird that is eviscerated and plucked would not be considered preserved and must have a fully feathered wing or head attached until the migratory game bird is frozen, made into sausage, cooked, dried, canned, or smoked..."




    Finally some common sense,,, This reduces the bird from possession once processed (...frozen, made into sausage, cooked, dried, canned, or smoked...) rather than having to be eaten or gifted first. Eliminates a lot of confusion about identifying what it is your sausage / ground meat and we no longer have to worry about leaving the wing / head on carcasses in the freezer. Should also discourage dumping of birds since what ever is your freezer will no longer will count against your possession.

    It should be noted that birds being transported into the USA will still a attached wing to comply with USA regulations.
     
  2. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    Possibly somewhere else in the document, but my interpretation is technically you are required to cook the bird with a wing or head attached. I realize that is absurd and not the intent of the law, but that's the way it reads...to me.
     
  3. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    I can see how you can read that into it,,,, however I think you can also read into that a bird with evidence of sex removed that goes straight into a freezer, sausage stuffer, smoker, frying pan, the roast pot etc. for "future use" is a bird removed from possession and no longer requires evidence of species.

    Essentially any bird that is transport from field to where it will be preserved for consumption needs to have a wing or head attached.
     
  4. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    I assumed that to be the intent. In reality, it's really not very different from ours. You have to leave an identifying characteristic until you are either cooking it or it is at your residence.
     
  5. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    It does appear legal now that if you are away from home, you can process your birds (preserve for future use such as cleaning and freezing them or getting them made into sausage) and then take the preserved birds home without having them count against your possession (provided you are staying within Canada).

    At least that is what I read into the proposal as presented.
     
  6. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    Better make amends to above statement, I missed the details... Preserving birds to remove them from possession must be done at a residence or non-mobile facility.

    "...Birds preserved during the day they were harvested would continue to count toward the daily bag limit of the hunter who harvested them. Partial processing of harvested birds may occur in the hunting areas. Birds may be eviscerated and plucked in any location, but the meat, along with the fully feathered head or wing, must be retained on the carcasses until they are later completely preserved. The subsequent processes for preserving (freezing, making sausages, cooking, drying, canning or smoking) must occur in a residence or a non-mobile facility, and must not be performed in the hunting area. Harvested birds would continue to count in the possession limit until they are completely preserved. An unpreserved bird would no longer count toward the owner’s possession limit when the bird is gifted to someone and the gift is accepted by the new owner...."

    That said, looks like dropping birds off at the local meat processor for freezing, grinding, processing into sausage should be okay ,,,and it does not really indicate that the residence must be the hunter's own residence?
     
  7. Chris Benson

    Chris Benson Elite Refuge Member

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    I would say this would be the case for the resident hunter, but non-resident still need to have a fully feathered wing attached.
     

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