Rookie question about handgun shells

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by Hawk, Aug 25, 2012.

  1. Hawk

    Hawk Elite Refuge Member

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    Ok, this may fall under the duh category for some but I am going to ask anyways.

    What is the difference between a jacketed hollow point and a home defense round? The reason I ask is because I can get 50 115 gran jacketed hollow points for $18 or 20 home defense rounds for $20-25. I know some of the home defense rounds are +p so obviously some velocity comes into play and I'm sure some expansion.

    Aren't they both technically jacketed hollow point shells? Would the cheaper regular jacketed hollow point work?
     
  2. grumpyduck

    grumpyduck Senior Refuge Member

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    Some of it is marketing, some is bullet design. Bonded bullets are less likely to have jacket and core seperation which impedes penetration. If marked +p then the rounds will be extra pressure and velocity but not neccessarily better performance. Ammo reliability in a specific gun, shot placement and penetration are the important factors when it comes to ammo performance. There are no "one shot drop" magic bullets, especially in handguns. Home defense rounds may not give as much muzzle flash which may or may not be important to you during a low light engagement. JHP's are JHP's unless you're comparing bonded vs. non-bonded bullets. Personally I'd stay away from the 115 grain bullets and go with a 147 grain in a 9mm if that's what you're shooting. Yes, "regular" JHP's would work. Chances are if you're using the gun for self-defense you're not shooting through barriers other than clothing so I wouldn't worry too much about jacket seperation.
     
  3. Hawk

    Hawk Elite Refuge Member

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    Thanks for the input, it's much appreciated. So if we are talking bonded and non bonded is the difference better penetration and less fragmentation?
     
  4. grumpyduck

    grumpyduck Senior Refuge Member

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    Depends on what the bullets are being shot into or through. The biggest difference between bonded and non-bonded bullets comes in when shooting through barries like glass or metal which is really tough on bullets. I presume you're asking about a home defense or concealed carry situation where shooting through a barrier isn't likely so either one would work.
     
  5. Jerry

    Jerry Elite Refuge Member

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    Whatever type of ammo you decide to use, dont forget to run a couple hundred rounds through the gun to verify reliability. :tu
     

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