School me on tractors and such

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by wprebeck, Dec 2, 2019.

  1. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    Coastal NC
    Aside from my FEL which we know is a must, the second most liked implement I have and would recommend is a quality landscaping rake, a.k.a. a Yorke rake. I do many things with mine ..... clean up field debris; clean out ditches; pull/grade dirt, reject, rock and gravel; cover broadcasted seed; scape dirt roads and paths; etc., etc. Tines are made of Italian steel, not that junk China stuff that bends by just looking at it.

    Get quality implements. I’m a BIG fan of www.everythingattachments.com Most everything they have they engineer/build/test themselves, use quality products and have great demo videos. They are very reasonably priced and they will ship reasonably too. I don’t have any affiliation with them but like doing business with someone that knows exactly what they’re doing.
     
  2. twall

    twall Senior Refuge Member

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    Ohio
    Do you know anyone that knows anything about tractors? My SIL recently bought a tractor. He liked the one with the better looking paint. I couldn't get the PTO engaged. The owner could. I told him to walk away from it. It took a while but he finally listened. He ended up buying a rougher looking tractor that worked.

    No one ever says they have too much horespower.

    Tom
     
  3. MJ1657

    MJ1657 Senior Refuge Member

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    East Central Minnesota
    20191208_110528.jpg This is my fleet. I put in several food plots. The '48 Oliver 88 second from the left is my main work horse. You done need a bunch of HP and expensive equipment to do what you want.
     
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  4. MJ1657

    MJ1657 Senior Refuge Member

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  5. Happy First Timer

    Happy First Timer Elite Refuge Member

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    Like many on here have said, no less than 40 hp. You will NEVER EVER regret having 4wd especially with a front loader. Fluid filled tires are a must. I wouldnt own a tractor without a front loader. Get one with quick attach. You can purchase pallet forks for it that come in real handy. I own a fleet of tractors, however my go too utility tractor is a new holland TC 40 DA with super steer. Hydrostatic transmission is an AWESOME feature for any type of loader work and for mowing around obstacles with a Bush hog. The other nice feature is you can train a monkey to drive it. It's a matter of pushing 1 petal forward for forward travel and the other petal for reverse. Easy peasy.

    As far as brands, buy whichever tractor brand has a PARTS DEALER closest to your house. They all break down no matter what color they are. The key to it is being able to get parts fast and make the repair and get back to work. It is inevitable, it will break right when you are trying to finish something before a big rain hits and you are trying to get a dove field seeded etc.

    As far as implements, 2 bottom plow, 8 foot drag disk, bush hog, pallet forks and loader bucket are the must haves for dove field work etc. A 6 foot grader box for your drive way grading and smoothing out roads around the farm. A landscape rake is a nice piece to have as well.

    Used cost
    2 bottom plow $200 to $500
    8 ft drag disk $300 to $600
    6 ft grader box $600
    6 ft bush hog $800 to $1000
    Pallet forks $500
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2019
  6. thatguy2

    thatguy2 Elite Refuge Member

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    Funny your go to is a New Holland. Prople here avoid them like the plague. I know 2 in the last 3 months that have lost tranamissions with under 100 hours.
     
  7. Happy First Timer

    Happy First Timer Elite Refuge Member

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    I think the newer models are made lighter and cheaper. I have a 2004 model. It was made out of real metal. Not a bunch of light weight crap. Now that I have read your post, mine will go out tomorrow. Lol
     
  8. wprebeck

    wprebeck Senior Refuge Member

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    Welp, it wasn't as big as I'd wanted, but we got a package deal from Kubota that was as big as my wallet could handle for now. To be honest, I think it'll suffice for quite some time, too -

    Got a 3901, tiller, bushhog, box blade, front end loader, and trailer all for around $26k or thereabouts. My fields are small and shouldn't demand a lot of horsepower, so we should be good. My son and I are taking tirns cutting right now, lol. The fields are covered in brush 4-5 feet tall, as the previous landowner didn't have anything done this year. Opening them up will make for better hunting...still have four days of bonus antlerless deer plus we predator hunt. Open fields are much easier to see yotes than the thick stuff.
     
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  9. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Elite Refuge Member

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    Try out your tiller. I guess it's from getting mineral from the soil but deer are always real curious about fresh dirt. Makes for legal baiting.
     
    MJ1657 likes this.
  10. wprebeck

    wprebeck Senior Refuge Member

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    I'll try and get on that tomorrow...if I'm going to get any time on the stand today, gotta do it soon.

    Anyone wanna school me on prepping a dove field? I know it's way too early for the work, but knowing what I'm in for will make it easier.
     

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