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Specks, specks and only specks.

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by Backwards bleed, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. Backwards bleed

    Backwards bleed Senior Refuge Member

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    Holy smokes! Those specks stay on the ice like that for a while or will they bug out?From what I hear they have really been piling into Illinois here recently. What you think 2widgn? You been noticing an uptick in the numbers that are staying longer there?
     
  2. 2WIDGN

    2WIDGN Senior Refuge Member

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    Definitely staying longer...got some good video but for some reason it won't post. Never had that many specks in my back yard. That picture was taken in early/mid February.
     
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  3. Nocalhonker

    Nocalhonker Elite Refuge Member

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    Norcal Rice Country
    upload_2020-3-20_23-23-46.jpeg
     
  4. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Here you go guys, I tossed this banded one just for you:
    upload_2020-3-21_6-53-28.jpeg

    Between one sort of misery and another, this turned out to be the first year since the mid '70s that I didn't kill a goose - of any sort. But I did get my hands on quite a few while helping with Paul Link's specklebelly telemetry study.

    No pics of the solar powered transmitter collars, as there's quite a monetary and man-hour investment in each, and it's best for the research if each sticks with its hen for however many years she and it can hold up without being targeted by some sorry-a--ed road hunter. So if you do spot a collar before pulling the trigger, please do the research a favor and move on to another target. And if you kill one inadvertently, help get the collar back into Paul's hands, and he'll see to it that you get a dummy version for mounting, if you're so inclined.
     
  5. Backwards bleed

    Backwards bleed Senior Refuge Member

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    Holy smokes! Those specks stay on the ice like that for a while or will they bug out?From what I hear they have really been piling into Illinois here recently. What you think 2widgn? You been noticing an uptick in the numbers that are staying longer there?
    It's crazy how these birds have began to stick around much later. They use to blow through here by october 15th most years!
    I think something happened to the site lastnight late. Please try posting the clip again. I love to see anything to do with these birds!
     
  6. Backwards bleed

    Backwards bleed Senior Refuge Member

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    That is such a natural looking setup!
    Deadly!
    Is that one snow in there a dead bird decoy or is it just chilling in your spread?:)
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2020
  7. Backwards bleed

    Backwards bleed Senior Refuge Member

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    Rick these telemetry studies blow my mind away! I cannot believe how far and fast these birds can move in a short time. I totally agree with not shooting a telemetry bird. With the migration routes all changing around, further studys are needed on these birds as well as all other waterfowl.
    I would consider myself lucky to be a part of that Rick. Sounds very interesting!
     
  8. Nocalhonker

    Nocalhonker Elite Refuge Member

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    He was sleeping I almost caught him he, I was less then a foot from grabbing him.
     
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  9. Backwards bleed

    Backwards bleed Senior Refuge Member

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    That's funny! Sometimes they like to sneak in on you. That spot looks really natural. I bet that there is goose poop and tracks all over it even when you have no decoys out!
    Nice spot.:tu
     
  10. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Talk to your state biologists. They may not have any telemetry work going at the time, but I think most states probably band some birds, which, if they're netting them, is quite labor intensive and likely largely dependent on volunteers. Have been on what would have been great shoots that were called off because there just weren't enough of us there to get the birds pulled from under the net in a timely manner (to avoid capture shock or hypothermia from thrashing enough to get wet to the skin) and do the related work, and your crews may encounter the same issue. Won't know if you don't ask.

    Here in Southwest Louisiana, Paul also has Coastal mallard and blue-wing teal telemetry projects going, and we also caught and transmittered a number of pintails this winter for another fellow's (in Texas?) project. I've not seen any of the pintail tracks - and perhaps just enough of the others to be dangerous. But the mallards largely seem to dig into places, schedules and routes they've found safe and stick pretty tight to them when the pressure's on, while more specks seem apt to say "The heck with this!" and move out altogether. (If someone who's seen more of the data and knows more about interpreting it says I'm wrong, they're likely right.)

    A better source for those with Instagram capabilities this Luddite lacks would likely be Paul's account: plink_the_bander

    Doubt you'll find much, if any, real-time info there, as he tries to be pretty secretive about things that might draw undue pressure to the birds' whereabouts, but I'd think there would still be some neat stuff.
     
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