Spinning Wings

LADucks

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I'm down for banning them. I think its a an actual step that we can make to have an effect on juvies. There's so much we can't do and can't change, this is one thing that can be done with the stroke of a pen.
 

Rick Hall

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I'm down for banning them. I think its a an actual step that we can make to have an effect on juvies. There's so much we can't do and can't change, this is one thing that can be done with the stroke of a pen.
At this point, the cost in lost stamp sales could be a serious impediment.
 

Cantcallatall

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When they first came out they were like magnets. Birds (including geese) would spot them from a distance and lock straight in. It was difficult to scare birds off (some would hover over the spinner even when we were shooting right past them).
Now they see so many of them the effect isn't that pronounced but if you don't have them the birds barely notice decoys.
I'm all for banning them. It will save me the aggravation (charging batteries, not functioning for some reason, guys thinking they are facing the wrong way, wrong location in the spread, scaring geese...) and cost.
 

DComeaux

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I use spinners today for teal season for the visibility but I haven't used those for the regular season for some time now. I'm fairly certain I could make do without the hassle of those things for teal as well. We had no issues taking birds prior to those hitting the market.

https://www.louisianasportsman.com/hunting/waterfowl-duck-hunting/the-story-behind-mojo-ducks/

An unintentional discovery in the cold strawberry fields of California somehow found its way to Jeff Simmons’ duck blind one cold opening morning nearly 20 years ago.

And the story of the magic duck began.

“It was opening day, and I had a good friend hunting with me,” Simmons recalled. “He had a duck-hunting friend in from California and brought him along.

“That morning things were crazy. There were plenty of ducks, but they wouldn’t work the decoys. I was frustrated and about to give up when the guy from California pulled out a contraption that just seemed like it would make things worse.”

Simmons wasn’t very accepting of the proposed tactic.

“He had a set of battery-operated white fan blades mounted on a stick. He wanted to put it out in the decoys. He insisted it would attract ducks,” Simmons said. “I told him he was crazy, but he kept on and on, and I finally gave in. We weren’t killing ducks anyway.

“He put the stick in the mud and turned it on.”

The hunt turned around almost instantaneously.

“Before he got back in the blind, 20 mallards fell out of the sky into the decoys. We got about six of them,” Simmons said. “I laughed it off as a fluke. But before we could gather up the ducks, here came another group — this time about 30 mallards.

“In 20 minutes, the five of us had gone from no ducks to our limit. I was stunned.”

It turned out that the spinning fans were used at farms back in California.

“The guy told us that in the Sacramento Valley when the weather got too cold too early, they put these white fans out around the strawberry farms to move the air and keep the berries from freezing,” Simmons said. “Every time they turned on the fans, ducks would lock up and head straight for the fields, landing there even though there was no water or no logical reason. It turns out the ducks didn’t like strawberries; they liked those slow-turning fan blades and thought it was the wings of other landing ducks.”

Click the link to read more.
 

Rick Hall

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Because you can’t use a mojo?
Wouldn't want to bet that most could kill enough ducks to make a gumbo without their spinners, much less stay at it.

But go wild, get 'em banned if you can. I'd like to see all electronic attractants banned, but I'm not holding my breath while you try to cram the gene back in its bottle - and gonna use them when they're an advantage in the mean time.
 

riverrat47

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I've got one, but I'll be damned if I know where it is. I haven't used it in years. In fact, I'm pretty sure I've only got one wing for it.
While I do think they probably contribute to higher mortality of juvies in the PPO, I think even juvies are suspicious of them by the time they get to the Illinois border. Hell, 15-20 years ago, I saw wingers be deadly one day, then flair them like crazy the next.
IMHO, after about 30 yrs. on the market, you aren't gonna put the genie back in the bottle. Regardless of the effectiveness, there's a whole generation or more of hunters who have never hunted without them. How many will quit if spinners are banned? With duck stamp sales down to record lows, do we hunters want to lose that revenue AND clout?
Besides, it's a slippery slope. I've seen spinners work and I've seen them be a major detriment. I also remember some wanting to ban goose flags when they first came on the market. Hey, jerk strings are often effective, let's ban them. How about G&H's keel modifications for current? Flocked decoys? Duck/goose calls? Mud motors and air boats have sure allowed access to places many could never have hunted. So has the outboard motor. How about banning ATVs, UTVs and even 4x4 trucks and SUVs? And, let us not forget that Mr. Nash Buckingham lamented that the automobile, allowing speedy and easy access, would be the downfall of wildlife population.
 

bill cooksey

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I use spinners today for teal season for the visibility but I haven't used those for the regular season for some time now. I'm fairly certain I could make do without the hassle of those things for teal as well. We had no issues taking birds prior to those hitting the market.

https://www.louisianasportsman.com/hunting/waterfowl-duck-hunting/the-story-behind-mojo-ducks/

An unintentional discovery in the cold strawberry fields of California somehow found its way to Jeff Simmons’ duck blind one cold opening morning nearly 20 years ago.

And the story of the magic duck began.

“It was opening day, and I had a good friend hunting with me,” Simmons recalled. “He had a duck-hunting friend in from California and brought him along.

“That morning things were crazy. There were plenty of ducks, but they wouldn’t work the decoys. I was frustrated and about to give up when the guy from California pulled out a contraption that just seemed like it would make things worse.”

Simmons wasn’t very accepting of the proposed tactic.

“He had a set of battery-operated white fan blades mounted on a stick. He wanted to put it out in the decoys. He insisted it would attract ducks,” Simmons said. “I told him he was crazy, but he kept on and on, and I finally gave in. We weren’t killing ducks anyway.

“He put the stick in the mud and turned it on.”

The hunt turned around almost instantaneously.

“Before he got back in the blind, 20 mallards fell out of the sky into the decoys. We got about six of them,” Simmons said. “I laughed it off as a fluke. But before we could gather up the ducks, here came another group — this time about 30 mallards.

“In 20 minutes, the five of us had gone from no ducks to our limit. I was stunned.”

It turned out that the spinning fans were used at farms back in California.

“The guy told us that in the Sacramento Valley when the weather got too cold too early, they put these white fans out around the strawberry farms to move the air and keep the berries from freezing,” Simmons said. “Every time they turned on the fans, ducks would lock up and head straight for the fields, landing there even though there was no water or no logical reason. It turns out the ducks didn’t like strawberries; they liked those slow-turning fan blades and thought it was the wings of other landing ducks.”

Click the link to read more.

Article is a little dated. More than 25 years ago now.
 

ARHHH4

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I’ve got maybe six or eight of them, and I can’t tell you the last time I used one. Twenty years ago they worked great in dry cut corn fields on the mallards, but it hasn’t been cold enough since then for birds in my area to feed like that. And, everybody and their brother who floods ten acres of corn at their “private club” has hurt the dry feeding in my area as well. I run a jerk rig on prolly 75% or more of my hunts if there’s little to no wind and my kill numbers have gone up versus when i run a flapper
 

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