State of Waterfowl Videos

Discussion in 'Louisiana Flyway Forum' started by DComeaux, Sep 25, 2019.

  1. DU4life

    DU4life Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    371
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2013
    Location:
    Texas
    Wasn't questioning your agricultural expertise, I was just wondering if maybe it made a difference. I know for a fact there's a lot more grain on the ground in those fields than there is left in a cut rice field in south LA.
     
  2. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Location:
    Acorn Ridge
    If there is things have changed since I was up there. Guess Merican’s are better at setting a combine. I will say this weather plays a huge role in how a particular crop harvests and that can change year to year, day to day and field to field. Canola is a tiny black seed and it can be tough to combine if conditions are poor. The reason they swath a lot of their crops, is to speed up drying time, before a combine and pickup head are used.
     
    Rebranger and bill cooksey like this.
  3. LADucks

    LADucks Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    195
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Location:
    LA
    One of the biggest differences being a soybean field cut when its dry and one cut while wet and running about 20mph to beat another rain! I just can't wrap my head around some claiming farmers leave more at some places vs others on purpose (on a scale that makes any kind of difference).
     
  4. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Location:
    Acorn Ridge
    To be honest, you’ll have grain loss in soybeans if they’re really dry. Most loss in soybeans comes from the reel turning on the header. As the reel is turning and comes in contact with the pod, it’ll cause it to pop open and lose the seed on the ground. Beans typically don’t average more than 70 bushel per acre and it’s nearly impossible to overload the seives on a combine, to make it spit them out the back. Beans will spoil quickly too, so waterfowl has a very short window that they’ll eat them. Most feeds in a bean field are for invertebrates and in a bean field they’re much easier for ducks to find them than a corn or rice field. A misnomer among alot of northern folk, is a flooded bean field sucks. It can, just as any other field but given the right location(Duck Hole) it can produce more birds than a corn or rice field. Gray ducks love bean fields and I’ve had some unbelievable shoots in a bean field.
     
  5. WuChang

    WuChang Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,107
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Location:
    the world is home to the Wu Chang Clan
    I guess the point becomes is there enough waste grain left to make it worth a duck's effort to forage there.
    What is the "give up point"?

    This study was made in 2005
    If it is still accurate today and I have seen no literature in the FWS stuff to say it isn't ( doesn't mean it is.... just no other data I could find)---
    then you can draw your own conclusions based on your experience or the experience of others.
    Understand this document is cited by the FF on their web site and is issued from the USFWS.
    I assume that means they think it is accurate or they agree with it or whatever they are saying these days.

    The moist soil estimate is based on 400 lbs per acre.
    I do not think they estimate the waste grain per acre for the crops....but it has been awhile since I read this document-- it may be in there.

    As always, your mileage may vary

    moist soil.jpg
     
  6. JHerr

    JHerr Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    5,183
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2007
    Location:
    LA
    I'd reckon if cutting and windrowing while green there would be very little shatter loss on the header. I would also reckon any shatter loss would be confined to the windrow? This is a guess as I've never seen it done and never been to Canada.

    And dry peas seems the way to go - no more purple/sore thumbs.
     
    Sunklands likes this.
  7. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,102
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2016
    Location:
    Acorn Ridge
    You got a feel for it, JHerr. If done properly they still should experience little loss. There’s some canola that is straight cut but alot of it is in the lower latitudes, where there a tad more drying time. By cutting with a swather, when green, they’ve basically knocked off at least 2-3 weeks of ripening time. Other grains and lentils are done similar.
     
  8. LADucks

    LADucks Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    195
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2017
    Location:
    LA
    Allow me to rephrase my post and change my statement from "dry vs wet harvest" to "optimal conditions vs wet harvest". Last wet harvest in our field made it look like the reel was a seesaw as the tires navigated the mud/ruts. Probably resembled a sugar cane harvest more than anything. Those are always nasty over here. They had a tough time but it was better than leaving it in the field which much of them in the area had to do.
     
  9. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,599
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2015
    You guys are friggin hilarious. We all know that if all it took was spinners to kill the ducks guys would flood mud. And if flooded crops weren’t an advantage people wouldn’t be paying tons of money to do it.

    Heck people would only hunt public land if private land didn’t make it easier. Lmao.

    Some of you guys are so deluded by the lies you’ve been telling so long, you actually believe them. Wow.
     
  10. DComeaux

    DComeaux Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    747
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Location:
    South Louisiana

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice