Testing Bullet Penetration At The Range

Discussion in 'Big Game Hunting Forum' started by Missy Skeeter, Jun 21, 2020.

  1. Missy Skeeter

    Missy Skeeter Senior Refuge Member

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    100 yards since my bear and moose shots are typically less than 100 yards.
    My main question is the penetration of Hammer bullets significantly better than TTSX?
     
  2. Missy Skeeter

    Missy Skeeter Senior Refuge Member

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    How about 1.5 inches of wet plywood, a milk jug filled with water,
    then layers of closed cell foam to catch the bullet and allow for a depth measurement?
    With that setup I will have to replace the milk jug filled with water after each shot.
     
  3. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Elite Refuge Member

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    I think celotex might be one of the better mediums you could use. It will absorb water. Use to have some cut in strips and then layered and compressed to create an archery target.

    Meaning use that between your layers of plywood.
     
  4. Dr Swane

    Dr Swane Refuge Member

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    Can you shoot a pig carcass? The meat would still be usable and the most realistic data.

    we can buy butchered/and whole hogs for $100 (70-90 pounds, and good to use the meat for home butchering, pig roast etc)
     
  5. Missy Skeeter

    Missy Skeeter Senior Refuge Member

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    I think there would be significant variation..first bullet hits a rib bone, next bullet passes between rib bones, next bullet mostly thru fat, next bullet mostly through muscle, etc. Right now I have a setup where 1 milk jug placed up front for initial bullet expansion, then 3 inches of wet plywood to simulate moose or bear bone, then a stack of closed cell foam layers to catch each bullet and for measuring penetration depth. I would replace the water-filled milk jug after each shot and mark the hole with a sharpie (black for bullet A, red for bullet B). I think the test would be as uniform as possible and allows for a sample size of more than 1 bullet.
     
  6. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Elite Refuge Member

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    I think 180 30 Cal with 60+ grains of 4831 is going to take more than a gallon jug and 3" of plywood to stop. Probably go back to alternating foam and layers of plywood till you have 9" of plywood.
     
  7. baltz526

    baltz526 Elite Refuge Member

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    I would probably just shoot them with partitions. That is what they were designed for. in .30 - 180gr Protected Point, 200gr, or 220gr semi pointed. Whichever I had ready to hunt with.
     
  8. Missy Skeeter

    Missy Skeeter Senior Refuge Member

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    I shot and reloaded Nozler partitions for 30 years, then switched to Barnes TTSX 10 years ago.
    2 reasons:
    My hunting partners were concerned about the risk of lead in their children's food so they all switched to TTSX.
    We have been happy with the terminal performance of TTSX ranging from 80gr TTSX on Sitka blacktails up to 180 gr TTSX on big bull moose.
    There are many scientific studies documenting lead fragmentation and its potential effect in venison burger.
    For example, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2669501/
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/wild-game-deer-venison-condors-meat-lead-ammunition-ban/
    https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdch/Lead_in_Venison_for_Families_310195_7.pdf

    Plus TTSX penetrate better than partitions, for example a 210 gr Partition with a muzzle velocity of 2850 fps penetrated 16.2 inches,
    while a 210 Barnes X with the same muzzle velocity penetrated 23.6 inches
    source: http://www.rathcoombe.net/sci-tech/ballistics/methods.html#medium_bore_table
    Penetration is important in bears because of their long hair their blood trail is more difficult to track than ungulates, so an exit hole helps.
    Penetration is important in bull moose because they are huge and punching thru a shoulder into the boiler room sometimes is needed.
     
  9. Farm4wildlife

    Farm4wildlife Elite Refuge Member

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    Man bringing up that you voluntarily went away from lead? Especially on a waterfowl hunting forum?

    I have been thinking about it myself, might change out a few of my bigger guns to lead free.
     

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