The mean streets....

Porter Bayou

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The only heirloom gun is an 1899 LC Smith #2. It would require a 2200-2500 restoration to be nice and be worth about the same once done. I would do that if I had someone that would keep and appreciate it but otherwise would be a waste of money.

Dunno...but I would hate to see it in a pile like that.
I'd keep and appreciate it;):no
 

BigSkyDuk

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They paid $100 dollars for handguns, $150 for rifles and shotguns, and $200 for "assault weapons".

They got no handguns, no assault weapons and approx 300 sporting guns, mostly single shot shotguns and .22 rifles.

So $45,000 later, they have removed the nationwide problem of crimes committed with single shot shotguns and the evil Glenfield .22 from the streets of Fayetteville.
So I see police department gun buyback programs are the one remaining sector of the economy untouched by inflation… :doh
 

Steel3's

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Yeah..I'm in that category on inheritance. No grand kids yet and even if I do, could be boy or girl. Even with a boy, will likely never hunt and possibly never shoot or otherwise own a gun. Between politics and the hobbies/interests of a potential son-in-law, it's all a toss up.

The only heirloom gun is an 1899 LC Smith #2. It would require a 2200-2500 restoration to be nice and be worth about the same once done. I would do that if I had someone that would keep and appreciate it but otherwise would be a waste of money.

Dunno...but I would hate to see it in a pile like that.
I'm coming to grips with the same things in both directions. There are things my parents held dear, like a record collection they kept for me, which I do not because ALL that music is available to me electronically whenever and wherever I want. Similarly, there are things I hold dear that my children do not, like my sporting literature collection.

Like it or not, the world changes, and I think it changes more rapidly now than it did between my great-grandfather's and grandfather's times. As a state wildlife manager, I hear it all the time, "I want to preserve this tradition for my grandchildren" (which is almost always code-speak for "the hunting has gone to hell"). Unfortunately, that is impossible. The world will be different for your grandchildren. Just look at how much more difficult it is to find affordable places to hunt compared to our grandfathers.

Back to the original topic, I've never seen a gun buy-back in Baton Rouge, LA look like that. I've "sold" a couple of worthless handguns for $100 in Circle-K gift cards, and those events were dominated by handguns while I was watching. Here's an excerpt from the last one I attended:

Officers collected 32 working guns plus two pellet guns and handed out $2,550 in gas cards, according to BRPD spokesperson Sgt. L'Jean McKneely Jr. They issued $300 gas cards for functioning assault rifles, $100 for any .380-caliber gun or above and $50 for anything below .380-caliber.
Among the firearms collected Saturday were eight shotguns, one assault-style rifle and eleven semi-automatic pistols.


Still a waste of effort to curb crime. Hell, some folks probably saw it as an opportunity to cleanly "fence" stolen weapons.
 

Timber Hole

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If they have one of those buybacks here I’m going to sell them the Daisy air rifle with a bent barrel that’s in the garage. I just want to do my part!!!
 

Il. MudDuk

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I don't know if I'm amused, upset or concerned (all 3 ?) about the term "assault style " rifle.
So now we have hunting rifles, assault rifles and assault style rifles ? I'd like one person to describe the difference, please.
 

HaydenHunter

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I don't know if I'm amused, upset or concerned (all 3 ?) about the term "assault style " rifle.
So now we have hunting rifles, assault rifles and assault style rifles ? I'd like one person to describe the difference, please.
I have one of those "Bug A Salt" guns I am tired of playing with. Can I get $200 for that "assault rifle"?
 

PaulinKansas

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A friend of mine has a pump 12 gauge. It dumps the shells from the mag onto the ground when you pump it. The forearm is mismatched and so is the stock. It's been spray painted too. He's waiting for a gun buy back to unload the p.o.s.
 

rhpierce

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I'm coming to grips with the same things in both directions. There are things my parents held dear, like a record collection they kept for me, which I do not because ALL that music is available to me electronically whenever and wherever I want. Similarly, there are things I hold dear that my children do not, like my sporting literature collection.

Like it or not, the world changes, and I think it changes more rapidly now than it did between my great-grandfather's and grandfather's times. As a state wildlife manager, I hear it all the time, "I want to preserve this tradition for my grandchildren" (which is almost always code-speak for "the hunting has gone to hell"). Unfortunately, that is impossible. The world will be different for your grandchildren. Just look at how much more difficult it is to find affordable places to hunt compared to our grandfathers.

Back to the original topic, I've never seen a gun buy-back in Baton Rouge, LA look like that. I've "sold" a couple of worthless handguns for $100 in Circle-K gift cards, and those events were dominated by handguns while I was watching. Here's an excerpt from the last one I attended:

Officers collected 32 working guns plus two pellet guns and handed out $2,550 in gas cards, according to BRPD spokesperson Sgt. L'Jean McKneely Jr. They issued $300 gas cards for functioning assault rifles, $100 for any .380-caliber gun or above and $50 for anything below .380-caliber.
Among the firearms collected Saturday were eight shotguns, one assault-style rifle and eleven semi-automatic pistols.


Still a waste of effort to curb crime. Hell, some folks probably saw it as an opportunity to cleanly "fence" stolen weapons.

I have no kids and won't, so I'm in the same boat. I have my grandfather's 16-gauge Model 12, a couple of doubles, etc. that I don't know what will happen.

Buybacks are stupid, no question.
 

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