What are things looking like in Nodak?

Discussion in 'North Dakota Flyway Forum' started by Uncle Fuzzy, Sep 10, 2020.

  1. Uncle Fuzzy

    Uncle Fuzzy Refuge Member

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    I'm curious as to how things are looking in SE Nodak. I have talked with a couple of farmer friends and they say the sloughs are way up. Late spring meant they didn't get all their crops in and there quite a bit of black dirt, but they're look to an early harvest. Last two years harvest was late and we found water holes in the middle of corn fields with ducks. Was there enough rain in July and August that we should look for the same? I guess anticipation is almost as much fun as the trip.
     
  2. PorkChop

    PorkChop Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    I can’t speak for the south east but North Central gets drier with each passing day. At this point we will need a good 10 to 15 inches of rain to make an impact
     
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  3. Rilez

    Rilez Refuge Member

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    Everything here in the SE that isn't usually wet this time of year is definitely not right now, we didn't have much for rain to speak of late this summer. I don't know if you've been hunting up here very long, so that may be a frustrating answer, but unfortunately it's the only one I got. The PLOTS book online would have all the typical water in the area. Your farmer buddies were right though, there are a lot of black dirt fields floating around right now, stuff that didn't get planted this year. The wheat harvest is winding down here & with our early frost, the soy bean harvest got moved up a couple weeks and will likely start sometime next weekend or shortly thereafter so it will start being easier to track them down and see where the pockets are.

    Are you exclusively a duck hunter and over water? Do you decoy or just pond hop?
     
  4. Chris Cerise

    Chris Cerise New Member

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    Very dry in the Northwest.
     
  5. Uncle Fuzzy

    Uncle Fuzzy Refuge Member

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    We have been going to the same area for fifteen years, so we know what the ebb and flow of the water levels is. We will hunt dry fields if the ducks are using them. Last couple of years the harvest was late and there wasn't much corn down. We will typically hunt the small sloughs, but then when the waters high, you're over your waders before you get to the edge of the open water, this year we're bringing boats along with all the other junk.
    Back when there were pheasants we would chase them in the afternoon. Guess we won't really know until we see things first hand.
     
  6. magnumyammerhammer

    magnumyammerhammer Senior Refuge Member

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    Lotta wheat here in central North Dakota, but not very much corn it seems.
    I think farmers around here got a little spooked after last year, there's also a lot of sunflower fields.
    Best of luck to you.
     
  7. Slough Smell

    Slough Smell Senior Refuge Member

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    I saw last years corn being combined well into June this year in the eastern part of the state. Could those fields be good for hunting if they are not plowed?

    I am further west. Less corn and we a already had a killing freeze so harvest should not be as late. Getting dry too.
     
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  8. Rilez

    Rilez Refuge Member

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    I've seen a couple people venture out and give it a shot this fall, but they're very black. I drive by one every day that has geese in it and didn't even bother giving it a shot while there were no wheat fields to hunt, there's nothing to hide you in them unfortunately. Unlike typical corn fields, there is nothing on the ground (ie. no leaves, no shredded material etc.) and the stalk stubs may or may not be left in most of the fields here in the Southeast, even in the ones the farmers haven't gone through and plowed during downtime this summer...I'm sure by the time you come up for duck season we will have an array of both wheat and bean fields for you to hunt. As Slough Smell mentioned above, the early freeze moved bean harvest up, I know the farmer I work with is planning to test the fields out for moisture and possibly start harvesting any day now so you should have plenty of fields to choose from.
     
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  9. magnumyammerhammer

    magnumyammerhammer Senior Refuge Member

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    I've seen two or three combines working bean fields around here now. Corns getting brown and start hang down too.
     

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