What boat for these conditions

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by ScottG, Sep 9, 2021.

  1. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    EB4C919C-10CF-4827-BC9E-9E1D3EB4E81F.jpeg

    Just ordered a carb rebuild kit because the fuel pump element was split and likely the reason why it kept flooding.

    Any idea on where to get the air intake, also i wouldn’t mind putting a hose barb on and get rid of the quick connect thing but can’t find one small enough. I assume you need to drill / tap that piece with the 2 screws shown in the above pic?
     
  2. dwhauss

    dwhauss Senior Refuge Member

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    Run a short piece of fuel line outside the cowling and put your connection there.
     
  3. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    I like that idea as the fuel line fitting on the carb seems delicate. What’s good to use here, hose barb or disconnect?

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  4. megasupermagnum

    megasupermagnum Senior Refuge Member

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    Don't get discouraged yet. I have no idea where these people come from that they want you to spend $5000 on a boat to go onto a glorified slough. What a bunch of snobs.

    A quick search shows it is possible your engine did not come with a air intake tube. Some older engines only had a metal screen bolted to the carb intake. Honestly, I'd just leave it. There's not a good reason to take them off, but there's not a good reason to go out of your way to make one either.

    There's no drilling and tapping involved for a fuel line. Off of your carb, say it's a 1/4" hose, or whatever size it is, run that hose through the hole in the front of the cowling, plus maybe 12". Then buy a brass double ended barb, one side 1/4", one side 5/16", or whatever size lines you are using. Then plug your main fuel line onto that. If you want a disconnect, I'd put it on the tank. They thread right on, but it probably has one already.

    Normally a fuel pump will not cause a flooding condition. If you replace the fuel pump, buy the whole pump. Trying to rebuild them turns out a failure too often to mess with. A carb rebuild kit is a great idea. Chances are good your float is to blame for flooding. When you take it apart, this era motor should have brass floats. Whatever they are, make sure they actually float, by sticking them in some water. Then make sure the float height is set correctly.
     
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  5. dwhauss

    dwhauss Senior Refuge Member

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    use the disconnect. That way you unplug it and no fuel runs back out of the carb or line.
     
  6. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    Ok, I’ll leave the intake as is.

    This piece came out:
    2D1990D6-4045-4285-A703-0E35F4599C44.jpeg
    I was able to get it back in, it seems snug but maybe some jb weld would be good there.

    Also found this:
    9A05027E-7BE0-45AE-B783-A9A91B6D0D05.jpeg

    So I ordered one of these kits off ebay:
    76222D8B-F52A-4826-B93F-090B1F7E7B2E.jpeg

    I believe the rubber orange valve thing needs to be at a 45* angle.

    Just tested the float in water and it floats.

    Turning the carb upside down, so float is all the way up, it didn’t stop air when blowing into the fuel inlet. So will be cleaning it to make sure that valve fully seats and doesn’t let fuel in when full.

    Also noticed the float cover has a shelf so needs to be positioned so float can go down fully. Not sure if that’s what you meant about float height.

    Thanks for the help!
     
  7. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    As for the boat, it’s super light weight, but couldn’t find any nameplate or specs on it. Maybe it’s homemade lol. This was the only marking I found:
    71E5C467-7289-4344-9055-EE377291D788.jpeg

    The aluminum has a “texture” to it, is this something that’s used by actual boat manufacturers?
     

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  8. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    Shake the float to see if it has any fuel in it. It could have some in it and still float in water. It has to float at the proper height.

    I've seen that textured aluminum used in times gone past. It's a cosmetic feature and I doubt the manufacturer used it in the building process. Most likely it's something someone added during it's long service life. I'd be better off answering that question if I knew WHERE on/in the boat it is being used...
     
  9. dwhauss

    dwhauss Senior Refuge Member

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    Texture is called corrosion. Oxidation eats the material sooner or later.
     
  10. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    The whole entire boat has it, it’s some sort of embossed aluminum. Here’s an example of it, not the exact pattern, but it’s very similar.

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    Maybe it was someone who worked at Boeing on the 777, hence the engraving posted previously.

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