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What do you look for?

Discussion in 'Snow Goose Hunting Forum' started by cole carroll, Feb 3, 2020.

  1. cole carroll

    cole carroll New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2016
    If you are new to an area or choose a new area to hunt how do you go about finding the roost and the feed.. let’s say you only have Friday afternoon past 2 pm and Saturday and Sunday to hunt/ scout how would you go about it not know where the roost or feed field is if there is one... I know you can drive around till you find some on the side of the highway but what if you don’t .. do you try to backtrack closer to the area you know and follow from there (being you can’t get permission in the areas you know that’s why you go to a new area) and just follow the flight birds heading north ? Never done this so I’m curious...

    but afterwards if you do find the field they are in.. do you just take a chance after getting permission on that field or do you wait till the next day to scout some more and try to just hunt Sunday? Also If they are “feeding” in a field what signs do you look for to ensure they are feeding in that field or have been?
     
  2. negooseman

    negooseman Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,588
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2013
    Location:
    nebraska
    We hardly ever scout to find the X and target migrators 99% of the time. Get under their migration highways, find a wide open field or water/field and setup. We try to find higher elevated fields than surrounding areas, don’t setup in low spots. A few other things to consider also depending on what type of decoys, number of hunters,etc. We’ve hunted the same field for the last 13 of 14(last spring the epic flood kept us from hunting it)springs we’ve had permission on it. It’s nearly the perfect field for hunting snows in and it’s hard for me to go elsewhere.
     
  3. jolle

    jolle Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,180
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2001
    Location:
    MO
    When I've done what you're describing, I get to a flat open area to glass the skylines for the morning/evening feed flights. You can see them a lot farther in the air than on the ground. If you see them, then start your trek following them. Don't get in too much of a hurry and watch for a few minutes as they'll shift directions or the majority break off and go another direction. I usually have an idea where I hope some are roosting and setup accordingly for where I can see the direction they go.

    After the dust has settled, consider your options if you've produced any. When we've found a good option, we'll discuss and start the setup that night in the dark. Other times when things haven't looked great we've had some dinner and discussed the situation and determine what to do. We have skipped a setup after an evening feed to opt to watch one more morning feed, and then we setup mid-day for Saturday afternoon into Sunday. This is usually b/c we haven't produced good options (such as walk in only access on a field that's not the X).

    After learning the area I'm moving towards running traffic as negooseman describes. I've got some feelings for flight paths and made connections with landowners to the point that we can setup for traffic w/o chasing them around.
     
  4. negooseman

    negooseman Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,588
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2013
    Location:
    nebraska
    Chasing the X takes way more time than I have with my work schedule. Put me under their migration routes in a good field and you hunt your whole time off instead of spending at least part of it trying to find a field.
     
  5. CUPTDUCK

    CUPTDUCK Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    731
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2001
    Location:
    Central LA
    I’m out on chasing the x, well at least most of the time. Where we hunt, the roost, the feed and the water is all fairly close together.....within a few miles of each other. I prefer to do what the others have mentioned and run traffic. We usually have 4 or five big bodies of geese nearby and they are constantly trading around. We pick up a flock here and there and everyone stays happy including the geese.
     
  6. negooseman

    negooseman Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,588
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2013
    Location:
    nebraska
    we have quite a few larger water bodies within a few miles of the field we hunt. If the birds buildup long enough we’ll have 250,000 geese using the area and the migration highway moving all day over us. It’s worked well over the years even though their route seems to be changing some.
     
    CUPTDUCK likes this.
  7. marshmob

    marshmob Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,565
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas
    We use to mostly chase the X but now run traffic. When we did chase there were 2 big considerations, how many days in a row were we hunting and was the wind north or south? If we had a decent north wind for a few days we’d find the X and set up since the birds would tend to come back. If there was any amount of a south wind, we’d get high in a field under a good traffic line. Since there’s usually 2-4 of us its tough to pull and reset spreads quickly so day in day out traffic seems to be safer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2020
  8. tornadochaser

    tornadochaser Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,039
    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2008
    Location:
    south dakota
    Not hard to find feeds during feeding time when you're in an area with good numbers. Pick a high spot and start glassing the horizons. Find the feed, see if birds are still coming into it, try to reverse the flight line or follow the birds back to roost at sundown, paying attention to the fields between the feed and the roost that may be good options to hunt traffic. Then bust out the platbook and start calling or knocking on doors; first the X, then fields in the flightline if turned down on the x.
     
  9. Juvie Juke Box

    Juvie Juke Box Senior Refuge Member Sponsor

    Messages:
    357
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2017
    Summed up well, too add. If you land the X field make sure a few things. The wind wont be blowing towards the roost in the morning. The roost is good distance away so your not shooting at the roost. Watch the birds in the field you know is the x, see if there comfortable. If there constantly hopping around every 5 minutes they probably aren't finding what their wanting. If they sit down and its feed mode go time with birds hopping only to get further up the field you're good. Be working on the other fields as well as the X at the same time. Sitting and watching a field you don't have permission for yet is a waste of time. Start making calls and knocking on doors for the X, and the fields inbetween it. Having a couple trucks out and not all putting your eggs in one area is also very helpful.
     
    Neck Collar likes this.
  10. timber hunter

    timber hunter Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,906
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2001
    Location:
    s.e.Iowa
    Been hunting Iowa during the C.O. since the beginning. NO WAY I would waste my time chasing the X here. Odds are super low on finding a field you can pattern and lower yet on getting in on it.
     

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