What shotgun has killed the most waterfowl?

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by Out of focus, Jul 27, 2019.

  1. NW BIRDHUNTER

    NW BIRDHUNTER Senior Refuge Member

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    I'm not sure, but back in the day of "lead shot, big bag limits, and big waterfowl numbers", in our neck of the woods the Remington 1100 was king. More efficient than any pump gun, and more desirable than any any other semi auto at the time.
     
  2. ALMODUX

    ALMODUX Elite Refuge Member

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    The only reason I (and likely many others) ever had 1100s, was because I couldn’t afford an auto 5. The 1100 wasn’t ‘more desirable’, just more affordable, ESPECIALLY used. A5s held their value. Anyone with half a brain new the Auto 5 was more dependable/reliable than the 1100s, especially for waterfowl hunting.
     
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  3. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    1100's were oft referred to as the "poor man's S/A" or the "sheet metal S/A".
     
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  4. fowlwhacker

    fowlwhacker Elite Refuge Member

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    I did not start hunting till the mid 70's but the two most popular guns I recall seeing in a boat, blind or pit were either 870's or 1100's. Still have a friend that choots and old A5 that was handed down to him and the only thing I recall ever breaking was the forearm.
     
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  5. NW BIRDHUNTER

    NW BIRDHUNTER Senior Refuge Member

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    Right. The 1100's were highly regarded. Many people preferred them. A lot of people didn't want to shoot an "humpback" that was an "old outdated, obsolete design", and a "pain in the *** to clean". With heavy magnum compression formed 2 3/4" lead loads, the 1100's could go extended periods of time without cleaning.
     
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  6. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator

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    I know I am in the minority, but that 'look' is ugly as sin to me. Shot one at the range, once. Told the guy I didn't see how anyone shot one, and would like to try. Everything I ever thought about them was confirmed in one shot.
     
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  7. Steelshot Scott

    Steelshot Scott Elite Refuge Member

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    There is no way the 1100 could be anywhere in the ballpark with the Model 12 or A5. The 1100 wasn't even introduced until the 1960's.

    As far as the "ugly" aspect of the humpback design is actually part of it's success as a waterfowling gun. The design presented a easy to acquire sighting plane that worked well on fast moving targets. It was why it quickly gained a reputation as a duck hunting gun.

    To fire one shot out of one is not giving it a fair chance. It is actually a lot of fun to shoot, it's long cycling action actually has a unique feel that creates more of a push rather than regular recoil. This actually assists you with quickly aimed second and third shots.
     
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  8. Sunklands

    Sunklands Elite Refuge Member

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    Speed load and magazine stop are features that weren’t imitated until decades and decades later. IMO, the lack of a vent rib on alot of early and mid production Auto 5’s never handicapped it or the shooters abilities, because of the design on the receiver. I’m sure it helped some folks but it’s more of an aesthetic and a sign of the trend, in those times.
     
  9. Mrs.10GAGENUT

    Mrs.10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    No rib or a flat rib never bothered me at all, I really don't like these extra high ribs on many of the guns made today especially on a hunting shotgun where they get in my way many times. The short flat ribs many of the Auto 5's had were in my opinion ideal.
     
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  10. Mrs.10GAGENUT

    Mrs.10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Proofs in the sales figures for the 1100 over 4 million sold and still counting. Remington wasn't trying to compete with the A-5 or Model 12, they were trying to make an affordable and reliable shotgun with the 1100, as I stated with over 4 million sold I think they succeeded in doing that.
     
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